Lance Armstrong Might Admit Doping
Reports say he's considering a confession to reduce lifetime ban
By John Johnson, Newser Staff
Posted Jan 5, 2013 5:53 AM CST
Lance Armstrong pauses during an interview in Austin, Texas, in 2011.   (AP Photo/Thao Nguyen, File)

(Newser) – Lance Armstrong has spent the last decade swearing up and down that he never, ever, used drugs to boost his performance, even as the evidence mounted and he got stripped of his titles and glory. Now, he might just fess up, reports the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Both quote anonymous insiders as saying that Armstrong is moving toward a confession, which could result in his lifetime ban from cycling and other sports being reduced.

The move raises all kinds of thorny logistics involving potential perjury charges, a federal whistleblower case, and lawsuits over previous winnings. But Armstrong has reportedly been talking to world and US anti-doping officials about the possibility. If he can get the lifetime ban reduced—in exchange for details on how he doped—he would be able to compete in cycling and triathlon events again, though he'd still probably have to wait years.

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Showing 3 of 22 comments
Kookey90
Jan 5, 2013 11:25 PM CST
As far as I'm concerned Lance is yesterdays news. Aside from keeping his name in the press, I see no value in his admitting to the doping scandal; he's already been disgraced. Admission to doping will not help him none.
793tango
Jan 5, 2013 7:48 PM CST
Admit to doping? Only if it fits in with his plan. The guy is an egomaniac who's probably feeling the pain of NOT being the sought after celebrity he once was.
BrushMan
Jan 5, 2013 10:11 AM CST
Why take urine samples, then wait decades to release the results? I don't think Armstrong was ever tested positive. The results of testing should be available within 24 hours. That way, this would never have happened.