CNET Reporter Quits Over Meddling CBS
Network forced review site to switch top gadget choice
By Matt Cantor, Newser User
Posted Jan 15, 2013 8:41 AM CST
This file photo taken Jan. 9, 2007 shows the CBS logo in Las Vegas.   (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

(Newser) – A CNET reporter has left the tech review site after owner CBS stepped in to alter a story. When the CNET team picked a Dish Network product as the best home theater and audio item at the Consumer Electronics Show, CBS rejected the choice. That's because CBS is in the midst of a legal battle with Dish, the AP reports. So CNET picked another product to top its list. The switch prompted Greg Sandoval's exit.

"I just want to be known as an honest reporter," Sandoval tweeted. "CNET wasn't honest about what occurred regarding Dish." Hours later, CNET Reviews Editor-in-Chief Lindsey Turrentine posted at the site that "the conflict of interest was real" and apologized to staff and readers for not announcing the true winner. For its part, CBS called the spat "an isolated and unique incident" regarding "a product that has been challenged as illegal," the Verge reports. When it comes to "actual news, CNET maintains 100% editorial independence, and always will."

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Comments
Showing 3 of 23 comments
fractal
Jan 15, 2013 4:25 PM CST
Apology does not count if CBS didn't offer reporter job back with substantial raise.
gomer99
Jan 15, 2013 3:11 PM CST
I must plead ignorance here. I have, since its first appearance, used cnet as my PRIMARY source for evaluating tekkie stuff. Through my carelessness, I did not know CBS owned them. [ often wondered why cnet started attaching shitware to recent downloads....now I know ] Never again........and boycott forever. Screw you, CBS.......fits right in with your national editorial policies........
jerrymac
Jan 15, 2013 2:23 PM CST
CBS called the spat "an isolated and unique incident" regarding "a product that has been challenged as illegal," the Verge reports. When it comes to "actual news, CNET maintains 100% editorial independence, and always will." Bullshit.