83 Miners Buried in Tibet Landslide
Only one body has been found so far
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Mar 30, 2013 9:33 AM CDT
In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, earthmovers remove rocks and mud at the scene.   (Chogo)

(Newser) – Rescuers digging for victims of a massive landslide at a gold mining site in mountainous Tibet found one body this morning, a day after 83 workers were buried in the disaster, Chinese state media reported. The fate of the other victims was unknown. The workers were buried when about 2.6 million cubic yards of mud, rock, and debris swept through the mine in Gyama village. They were believed to be sleeping in their tents at the time.

The disaster has spotlighted the extensive mining activities on the Tibetan plateau and sparked questions about whether mining activities have been excessive and destroyed the region's fragile ecosystem. Criticisms, however, only flashed through China's social media today before they were scrubbed off or blocked from public view by censors. State media reports say the mudslide was caused by a "natural disaster," without giving specifics.

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Showing 3 of 6 comments
right2dave
Mar 31, 2013 4:38 AM CDT
Chinese rushed to help?
Seth_Meyers
Mar 30, 2013 12:34 PM CDT
Well, nobody forced them to work there! I don't believe anyone has ever died in a coal mine - let's see just ONE death certificate that says, "killed in a coal mine." You can't tell a man how to run his business!... Oooh, wait, those stupid arguments only apply to workplaces still being POISONED by TOXIC TOBACCO SMOKE, don't they? (No, they don't.)
BinThereDunThat
Mar 30, 2013 10:24 AM CDT
How long has China been stealing Tibet's gold?