Cousteau Grandson Spending October Underwater

Fabien Cousteau looks to break grandfather's record

By Evann Gastaldo,  Newser Staff

Posted Jul 1, 2013 1:48 PM CDT

(Newser) – While you're spending October planning what candy you'll hand out on Halloween, Fabien Cousteau will be spending the month underwater. He's aiming to spend a record-breaking 31 days in the deep blue, surfacing on October 31, on the 50th anniversary of his grandfather Jacques Cousteau's record-setting 30 days underwater in the Red Sea. The third-generation oceanographer and a team of five others will stay at NOAA's Aquarius habitat, a 43-foot cylindrical lab off the Florida Keys that sits 50 to 60 feet below the surface—the last undersea lab still in operation, Reuters reports. The adventure, which will take place twice as deep as the elder Cousteau's, will be broadcast 24 hours a day, the Tampa Tribune adds.

While there, the "Mission 31" team will go diving outside the lab and will also explore on underwater motorcycles, collecting information about the ocean's health as well as the impact living underwater has on their bodies. "We get to see things in the way you would if you were immersed like a fish," Cousteau says. They'll look for evidence of climate change and test new equipment, the Florida Keys Keynoter reports. They'll also Skype with school children, the Weather Channel, and International Space Station astronauts; make a 3D IMAX documentary; and entertain VIP guests including Richard Branson and, tentatively, will.i.am. As for the nitty-gritty, Aquarius does have a shower, bathroom, and air conditioning in addition to six bunks, where they'll sleep just five to six hours per night.

In this undated photo released by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Sanctuary Program, a diver swims by the Aquarius Reef Base off Key Largo, Fla.   (AP Photo/NOAA National Marine Sanctuary Program)
Dr. Sylvia Earle peeks through one of the windows of Aquarius, the world's only underwater habitat in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, in Key Largo, Fla. in this Aug. 6, 1998 file photo.   (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano, File)
In an undated file photo provided by NOAA the Aquarius, an underwater laboratory rests in a sand patch adjacent to deep coral reefs in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, at depth of 63 feet.   (AP Photo/NOAA)
In this undated photo released by One World One Ocean, Sylvia Earle looks out of a porthole from Aquarius, the undersea research laboratory in the Florida Keys.   (AP Photo/One World One Ocean, Mark Ostrick)
« Prev« Prev | Next »Next » Slideshow
My TakeCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
5%
66%
2%
21%
1%
5%
To report an error on this story, notify our editors.

NEWS FROM OUR PARTNERS
Other Sites We Like:   The Street   |   MSN Living   |   PopSugar Tech   |   RealClear   |   24/7 Wall St.   |   Biography   |   Barstool Sports   |   OK!