Scientists Solve 'Abominable Mystery' of Flowers
New research finds they could be as old as dinosaurs
By Ruth Brown, Newser Staff
Posted Oct 2, 2013 7:20 AM CDT
Updated Oct 2, 2013 7:40 AM CDT
This illustration from provided by the Natural History Museum of Utah shows a "Nasutoceratops titusi."   (AP Photo/Natural History Museum of Utah, Andrey Atuchin)

(Newser) – Flowers have been around since the very first dinosaurs were able to trample them underfoot, new research suggests. Science already knew that flowering plants started showing up in the age of dinosaurs. But a study led by a paleobotanist at the Universty of Zurich has unearthed 245 million-year-old grains of pollen that resemble those of flowering plants—100 million years older than any previously discovered flowers, reports LiveScience.

The scientists used laser scanning microscopy to examine the samples, which date back to the Middle Triassic period, and found six distinct types of pollen that looked almost exactly the same as samples from the Early Cretaceous, reports the BBC. The research, published in Frontiers in Plant Science, sheds light on the long-mysterious origins of flowering plants, which previously looked as though they'd been dominant the moment they appeared. "This sudden appearance has bothered scientists ever since Darwin, who called the origin of flowering plants an 'abominable mystery,'" the lead researcher says.

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Showing 3 of 7 comments
ChuChu
Oct 3, 2013 12:58 PM CDT
How can something be 100 million years older than previously thought when the universe is only 10 thousand years old at the oldest? My Sunday school teacher already did this research. So, this is bull. Fricking science is always trying to distort the reality of my desert religion.
OrneryPup
Oct 2, 2013 9:47 PM CDT
Which came first, the flower or the seed ?
Pandabearandfriend
Oct 2, 2013 3:07 PM CDT
"This sudden appearance has bothered scientists ever since Darwin, who called the origin of flowering plants an 'abominable mystery,'" the lead researcher says. Wouldn't this "abominable mystery" apply to everything then? Why only flowering plants? Everything has to have a seed to begin life. Or are they referring to a particularly, peculiar flowering plant?