Stronger Economy Just Might Kill You
Study finds higher deaths in boom times among middle aged, elderly
By John Johnson, Newser Staff
Posted Oct 8, 2013 8:50 AM CDT
In this April 4, 2013, file photo, people line up for entry to a job fair in Montpelier, Vt.   (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

(Newser) – A booming economy would seem to be good news all around, but a new study finds a strange thing: More middle-aged people and seniors tend to die in a strong economy than in a weak one, reports Medical News Today. Specifically, Netherlands researchers found that death rates in developed countries rose for people 40-44 and 70-74 as the GDP ticked up. Every 1% rise in the GDP translated into an increase in the death rate for both groups of about 0.36%.

So what's going on? The scientists aren't sure, but they float a number of theories rounded up by LiveScience. A strong economy means more people are schlepping out to work in the morning, which theoretically raises the risk of traffic accidents and work-related stress, at least for the 40-somethings. As for the older group, they might be getting less care from adult children tied to their jobs. The researchers say these are just best guesses, however, and say the topic needs more study.

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Showing 3 of 30 comments
Econ_101
Oct 12, 2013 2:35 PM CDT
Don't you know how it works ? We spend ourselves into becoming millionaires (Or what ever) When we are all millionaires we don't have to pay it back because we owe it to ourselves !!! Get it ?
Econ_101
Oct 9, 2013 11:43 AM CDT
You do know how to run a five and dime store don't you?
BillGalluccio
Oct 8, 2013 12:31 PM CDT
NEWSFLASH! Everybody is going to die one day. How about people stop worrying about everything and just live their lives. Don't worry about things you can't control and focus on how you can be happy, regardless of your current situation.