Don't Mess With Spain's Perfect Eating Schedule
Actually, the US should adopt it, says LV Anderson
By Evann Gastaldo,  Newser Staff
Posted Feb 19, 2014 11:29 AM CST
If you lived in Spain, this might be your breakfast each morning.   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – In case you hadn't heard, Spain is considering making some pretty radical changes—switching time zones and cutting siestas in order to get onto a more typical 9-to-5 workday schedule—and LV Anderson thinks that's a terrible idea. Consider a typical "Spanish mealtime regimen," she implores us on Slate: It usually starts with coffee and a pastry around 8am, followed by another pastry at 11am, the big midday meal around 2pm, a light bite around 6pm, and a light dinner around 10pm. That's just not sustainable if the Spaniards end up on a more American schedule.

Think of all the benefits of Spain's meal schedule: "Spanish customs will ease you gently into the day with two small, delicious snacks that wake you up and pique your appetite for the midday meal." And that midday meal provides a long break from work, which is good, because "it’s impossible to stay focused for 8 hours straight, the way we’re expected to on a 9-to-5 schedule. It’s much better for personal productivity to get away from one’s desk for the midday meal." And as for that late dinner, remember, the sun doesn't set in Spain until around that time. In short, "Spain shouldn’t change its routine. We should change ours." Click for Anderson's full column.
 

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