The Lego Movie Transcends Politics
Because it's a giant ad: Noah Kristula-Green
By Matt Cantor, Newser User
Posted Feb 19, 2014 3:27 PM CST
This image released by Warner Bros. Pictures shows the character Bad Cop/Good Cop, voiced by Liam Neeson, in a scene from "The Lego Movie."   (AP Photo/Warner Bros. Pictures, file)

(Newser) The Lego Movie has garnered positive reviews from people all over the ideological spectrum, which is unusual in an era when "everything is politicized." Why the widespread approval? "What really makes the film work is that it represents the highest form of capitalist expression," writes Noah Kristula-Green in the American Conservative. "It is a commercial" for Legos. And it's a good one, because its makers know how to target audiences' core beliefs. (Warning: Spoilers ahead.)

Near the end of the movie, we learn that a real-world 8-year-old boy is using Legos to play out disagreements with his father. While the dad wants to build sets according to strict rules, the boy wants to get more creative. Ultimately, the kid wins. Thus the movie appeals to kids' desire to play with toys while giving parents "a compelling value-proposition" for buying them. Its message: "Because your child will have fun and you can bond and avoid estrangement!" Kristula-Green writes. But "there is nothing in the final 20 minutes of the film that could not have been presented in one minute and 30 seconds." Click for the full column.

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Showing 3 of 6 comments
thewhiterider
Feb 21, 2014 12:52 PM CST
I thought the movie was pretty boring, actually.
NSA-CIApuppet
Feb 20, 2014 3:49 PM CST
"a real-world 8-year-old boy is using Legos to play out disagreements with his father. While the dad wants to build sets according to strict rules, the boy wants to get more creative. Ultimately, the kid wins." What about welts and bruises in accordance with strict rules? Oh, wasn't in Kansas. Gotcha
toomanycars
Feb 20, 2014 11:56 AM CST
This is so funny. When my sons were little all they wanted for Christmas was Lego's. They carefully followed the directions and proudly showed off their creation. Then it sat. And sat. Then it slowly fell apart. If one of the cats knocked it over then forget it, it had to be taken apart. If we still had the instructions, he would put it back together. If there was ONE PIECE MISSING, the whole thing would be dumped in the giant Lego mix box, to be ignored forever more. My boys liked the DIRECTIONS on those damned kits. Like putting together a puzzle. Do you know how EXPENSIVE those damn Star Wars kits are, just to have my fat cat knock it over or my son getting board with it, because the thrill of putting it together has passed, so he dumps it in the Lego mix box only to exclaim for his birthday he wants the the bigger more expensive kit to build??? AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!