Edward Snowden, PR Mastermind
In TED Talk, Snowden promises more revelations
By Kevin Spak, Newser User
Posted Mar 19, 2014 11:34 AM CDT
Edward Snowden talks during a simulcast conversation during the SXSW Interactive Festival, March 10, 2014, in Austin, Texas.   (Photo by Jack Plunkett/Invision/AP)

(Newser) – Edward Snowden made a surprise appearance—via a remote-controlled video chat robot—at the TED conference yesterday, and, as at his SXSW appearance, he got a warm welcome. The inventor of the Internet himself, Tim Berners-Lee, appeared onstage and called Snowden a hero, Wired reports, and a vocal segment of the crowd agreed, according to Fortune, with only about 10% deeming him a villain. Snowden's most headline-generating pronouncement was that "there are absolutely more revelations to come. Some of the most important reporting to be done is yet to come."

But the appearance itself fascinated David Weigel at Slate. Snowden has essentially positioned himself as a "cyborg thought leader," Weigel writes. With these appearances, he's "controlled his image like … well, like a guy who doesn't give out his contact info and lives in a country that American journalists need a visa to visit." Snowden's TED and SXSW hosts asked exactly the questions he wanted and avoided uncomfortable ones he didn't—like, say, anything to do with Russian politics. "Snowden has outlived the DB Cooper mystery that defined his public debut, and is now situated for a long game in which he becomes more popular and harder to call a traitor." Click for Weigel's full column.

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jonnymop
Mar 20, 2014 1:16 AM CDT
He also uses alot of umm. aaa. ....
jonnymop
Mar 20, 2014 1:14 AM CDT
david weigel at SLATE is fascinated. he decided that Snowden could be a "cyborg thought leader"
anarchy8
Mar 20, 2014 12:53 AM CDT
CORRECTION: Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web, not the internet.