'Let's Play Two': Hall of Famer Ernie Banks Dead at 83
'Mr. Cub' hit more than 500 home runs
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Jan 24, 2015 7:32 AM CST
In this March 24, 2014, photo, Ernie Banks talks during an interview at the Cubs offices in Chicago.   (M. Spencer Green)
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(Newser) – Even as the Chicago Cubs lost one game after another, Ernie Banks never lost hope. That was the charm of "Mr. Cub." Banks, the Hall of Fame slugger and two-time MVP who always maintained his boundless enthusiasm for baseball despite decades of playing on miserable teams, died last night at age 83. The Cubs announced Banks' death, but did not provide a cause. Banks hit 512 home runs during his 19-year career and was fond of saying, "It's a great day for baseball. Let's play two." In fact, that sunny finish to his famous catchphrase adorns his statue outside Wrigley Field. He played both shortstop and first base.

In a statement today, President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama expressed their condolences "to the family of Ernie Banks, and to every Chicagoan and baseball fan who loved him." The president said Banks became known as much for his optimism and love of the game as his home runs and back-to-back National League MVPs. Though he was an 11-time All-Star from 1953-71, Banks never reached the postseason. The Cubs, who haven't won the World Series since 1908, finished below .500 in all but six of his seasons and remain without a pennant since 1945. Still, he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977, the first year he was eligible, and was selected to baseball's All-Century team in 1999.