2 Feet of Snow Hit New England
New England sets snowfall record set in 1978
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Feb 9, 2015 5:31 PM CST
Workers clear snow near the Statehouse on Beacon Hill, Monday, Feb. 9, 2015, in Boston.    (Steven Senne)
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(Newser) – More than 2 feet of fresh snow piled up in parts of New England today, breaking records set during the Blizzard of 1978 and testing the patience of officials and commuters as forecasters warned of more winter misery later in the week. The latest onslaught forced the cancellations of hundreds of flights, tested transit systems and tempers, and collapsed roofs straining beneath the weight of 5 feet or more that has fallen in less than two weeks. "It's awful. I'm done with it. It's ridiculous," says Priscilla Medina, a sandwich shop worker in Westborough, Mass., suffering from a nasty case of snow fatigue. Tomorrow may offer no reprieve, with all MBTA rail services suspended throughout the day, the Boston Globe reports.

By midafternoon, the weather service reported an unofficial measurement of 24.5 inches in Quincy, Cohasset, and Weymouth, all south of Boston. Norwell got 23.3 inches, Milton 22.6 and Braintree 21. Sudbury and Ashland, west of Boston, got 16 inches. Logan Airport in Boston had well over a foot, and the city was forecast to get as much as 2 feet. Much of Connecticut and parts of upstate New York braced for 6 to 12 inches, and southern Maine was in for about 8 by the time the storm tapers off tomorrow. As for Boston, it has set a record for the most snow recorded in a 30-day period, with 61.6 inches by 7am this morning, breaking the record of 58.8 inches set in February 1978.
 

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