Woman's Letter to Plane's Pilots Goes Viral
'Thank you for taking me home. Thank you for doing so safely.'
By Kate Seamons,  Newser Staff
Posted Apr 1, 2015 8:18 AM CDT
Updated Apr 5, 2015 7:00 PM CDT
The letter.   (Twitter / @jaidillon)

(Newser) – Jai Dillon's Twitter bio describes him as an "airline pilot operating the B737 soon to be operating the A320." So it's not overly surprising that he'd tweet something a fellow pilot passed along. Except in this instance, and in the context of the Germanwings crash, it's a tweet that certainly didn't go unnoticed. "A letter given to a colleague from a passenger onboard his aircraft.. [sic] Providing proof that we're all in this together," Dillon tweeted this week, attaching a photo of a letter signed by "Bethanie." It begins, "In light of the very recent tragedy in the French Alps and the loss of those poor 150 people, I feel the need to reach out to you and extend a compassionate hand." Media outlets are describing the letter as touching, emotional, heartfelt, and beautiful. How it continues backs up those adjectives:

"At the end of the day, we are all humans just trying to live this rollercoaster of a life we have been handed. I understand an event so horrific as this one affects those with your responsibility more than others, and maybe sometimes a kind word, random but heartfelt, can make a difference. I'm hoping to create a ripple effect and spread some compassion and understanding.

"Thank you for taking me home. Thank you for doing so safely. Thank you for allowing me to live the life I do in Spain and split my time with my family in England too. You make the excitement I feel now to see my family possible. I hope you get to see your families soon. I've had a wonderful flight and hope you have too. You're making a massive difference and you're the reason I can smile tonight."

BuzzFeed confirmed that the letter is authentic via Dillon, who wouldn't give identifying details about the airline or flight it was written on due to security reasons. The letter has been retweeted nearly 4,000 times in the last 48 hours. (Read the latest on the Germanwings crash investigation here.)