Pacquiao Could Be in Trouble Over Injury
Adding insult to the whole shoulder thing
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted May 5, 2015 8:26 AM CDT
Updated May 5, 2015 10:41 AM CDT
In this May 2, 2015, file photo, Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, hits Manny Pacquiao from the Philippines during their welterweight title fight in Las Vegas.   (John Locher)
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(Newser) – Manny Pacquiao could face disciplinary action from Nevada boxing officials for failing to disclose a shoulder injury before he lost the sport's richest fight ever against Floyd Mayweather Jr. Nevada Athletic Commission Chairman Francisco Aguilar said yesterday that the state AG will look at why Pacquiao checked "no" a day before the fight on a questionnaire asking if he had a shoulder injury. Pacquiao could face a fine or suspension for not answering the question accurately. "It was not an anti-doping issue," says Travis Tygart, who heads the US Anti-Doping Agency, which was a third party to the fight. "The real question is why his camp checked 'no' on the disclosure. Either they made a terrible mistake to not follow the rules or they were trying not to give information to the other side."

Two hours before the fight, Pacquiao's corner asked Nevada regulators if he could be given a shot of Toradol, an anti-inflammatory. Aguilar denied it, saying the commission had no previous indication there was an injury and could not allow a shot in fairness to the Mayweather camp. NAC Executive Director Bob Bennett said Pacquiao filled out the form himself and understood the questions. "They didn't tell us a month ago," Bennett said. "They're not obligated to, but two hours before the fight they wanted a painkiller. That put us in a very precarious position." Pacquiao's camp said he decided to proceed even without the shot: "He makes no excuses. Manny gave it his best." Meanwhile, an orthopedic surgeon confirms Pacquiao will undergo surgery this week to repair a "significant tear" in his rotator cuff.
 

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