Open in Boston: Supermarket Selling Old Food
Non-profit Daily Table sells healthy but aging food at low prices
By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 5, 2015 2:30 PM CDT
File photo of supermarket produce.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

(Newser) – A non-profit grocery store opened in Boston yesterday with an interesting premise: Collect food that would otherwise go to waste because it was near its sell-by date and sell it to people at low prices. Daily Table, the brainchild of former Trader Joe’s chief Doug Rauch, opened its doors in the Dorchester neighborhood, specializing mostly in food donated by wholesalers and markets, NPR reports. While the food isn’t as fresh as the stuff you might find at other grocery stores and might have blemishes, it’s safe to eat and is sold at cost or with a small mark-up to cover the costs of labor, rent, food, trucking, and storage. A sample of the bargains: a dozen eggs cost $1.19, potatoes are 49 cents a pound, a block of cheese runs $1.99, and a box of cereal could sell as low as 79 cents, per the Boston Globe. And you won’t find any soda or candy, reports Supermarket News.

One customer, who appeared to buy enough food for his family for a week, paid just $30.46, notes NPR. Daily Table also puts out healthy meals prepared in the supermarket’s kitchen, with entrees like chili and pasta starting at $1.79 and side dishes from 50 cents, to compete with fast-food prices, per Time. "The recipes have to change every day because the donations change every day," says head chef Ismail Samad, who previously worked at the Michelin-starred restaurant Aureole. "The top of the kale might be getting a little light green. We cut that off and sauté it up." If this location is successful, Racuh plans to expand to cities across the country, including Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. (The nation's No. 1 organic grocer is a new surprise.)