10 Years After Katrina, the 10 Best Things to Read

Is New Orleans ready for another big hurricane?
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Aug 25, 2015 2:44 PM CDT
This combination of photos from Aug. 30, 2005, and July 29, 2015, shows downtown New Orleans flooded by Hurricane Katrina and the same area a decade later.   (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

(Newser) – Here are some of the stories catching our eye to mark the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina:

  • New Orleans Is Still Not Prepared for the Next Storm, the Atlantic: Improvements made by the Army Corps of Engineers have helped, but more infrastructure investment is needed.
  • Katrina Washed Away New Orleans' Black Middle Class, FiveThirtyEight: The recovery has left behind many African-Americans who still make up the majority of the city's population.
  • 6 Young Survivors Relive Hurricane Katrina, the Storm That Changed Their Lives, MTV.com: “There were police officers [in small rowboats] … coming to get as many people as they could."

  • New Orleans Is Haunted by the Death of Vera Smith, the Independent: Five days after the storm hit, her body lay where it fell, until it was finally buried in a makeshift grave. It symbolizes the "utter breakdown of authority."
  • Half of New Orleans Remains in Ruins, Newsweek: The story is illustrated with photos.
  • A 'New' New Orleans Emerges 10 Years After Katrina, Christian Science Monitor: An "engaged populace and a surge in millennials" helps re-energize the city.
  • 'New Orleans West': Houston Is Home for Many Evacuees 10 Years After Katrina, the Guardian: About a quarter-million residents fled to Houston after the storm, and many still remain.
  • If You Want to Understand Black Lives Matter, You Have to Understand Katrina, Slate: The storm exposed our "amazing tolerance for black pain."
  • Dear New Orleans, by Steve Gleason at Evacuteer.org: The former Saints player who inspired the city pens a love letter to New Orleans.
  • The Myth of the New Orleans School Makeover, New York Times: An essayist doesn't think the "New Orleans miracle" is all that it seems. But here is an opposing view about that.
(Read more Hurricane Katrina stories.)

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