MSF: We're Running Out of Snakebite Treatment
Doctors Without Borders says manufacturer halted key anti-venom
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Sep 7, 2015 9:16 AM CDT
In this July 2015 photo, Banywich Bone, 18, who had his leg amputated after a severe infection from a snake bite, convalesces at Agok hospital, South Sudan.   (Pierre-Yves Bernard/MSF via AP)
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(Newser) – Doctors Without Borders says the world will run out of one of the most effective treatments for snakebites next year, risking the lives of tens of thousands of people, mostly in developing countries. In a statement today, the medical charity warned that existing stockpiles of the anti-venom Fav-Afrique produced by Sanofi Pasteur will expire in June. The company stopped producing the anti-venom last year and has since switched to making a rabies treatment instead. "We are now facing a real crisis," said Dr. Gabriel Alcoba, the charity's snakebite adviser. The aid group, also known by its French acronym MSF, said there would likely be no alternative to replace the Sanofi Pasteur snakebite treatment for at least two years.

A spokesman for Sanofi Pasteur said the pharmaceutical was driven out of the market by competitors selling cheaper products and that they announced in 2010 they would stop making anti-venom. "It's very strange that (health officials) are only realizing this problem five years later," said a Sanofi Pasteur rep. He said the company has offered to transfer the anti-venom technology to others but "nothing has materialized yet." About 5 million people are bitten by snakes every year, including 100,000 deaths and several hundred thousand others who suffer amputations or other disabilities. Anti-venom typically costs $250 to $500. Before a meeting this week in Switzerland, MSF called for international agencies to ensure that snakebite treatment is available where needed. MSF said that the World Health Organization should play "a leading role" in solving the problem and criticized the agency for labeling the issue as a neglected condition.
 

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