This Girl Will Solve Your Cybersecurity Problems for $2
The 11-year-old has a background in lemonade stands
By Michael Harthorne,  Newser Staff
Posted Oct 27, 2015 4:23 PM CDT
Updated Oct 31, 2015 5:00 PM CDT
Eleven-year-old Mira Modi just launched her own cybersecurity business.   (Screenshot)

(Newser) – What if we told you that for just $2 you could have a near-unbreakable password? What if we told you that password would come courtesy of an 11-year-old girl whose only prior business experience was in lemonade stands? Ars Technica reports New York City sixth-grader Mira Modi launched her own cybersecurity business—Diceware Passwords—this month. Diceware is a password-creation process that's been around for decades. You roll a six-sided die five times to make a five-digit number, which corresponds to a short English word. Do that six times, and you have a passphrase that it would take something like an entire country's security agency to crack, according to Diceware Passwords. Do it eight times, and the passphrase is unbreakable with any known technology and should be safe until at least 2050. (The key is the phrase's entropy, or randomness, explains the Next Web.)

"I started this business because my mom was too lazy to roll dice so many times, so she paid me to roll dice and make passwords for her," Modi says on her website. "Then I realized that other people wanted them, too." If you order a password from Modi, she'll roll her dice, handwrite your phrase on a piece of paper, and physically mail you the only copy, Ars Technica reports. On her website, Modi also recommends clients capitalize random letters or add symbols so their final password is "not the exact same one that I gave you." She's sold about 30 so far. Modi says it's important to have strong passwords as hackers and computers get more sophisticated, even though most people her age are busy sharing the simple passwords to their Instagram accounts with each other. "I don’t think my friends understand," Modi tells Ars Technica. "But I think it’s cool." (This list of the worst passwords shows how lazy we are.)