Climate Change Could Drive 760M From Home
100M could be forced into extreme poverty: report
By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 9, 2015 9:03 AM CST
A man paddles a boat as he checks on the property of his in-laws in Garfield, Texas, on Oct. 31, 2015.   (Jay Janner/Austin American-Statesman - statesman.com via AP)
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(Newser) – Not yet terrified by climate change? You're in for a rude awakening via two new reports. The first from the World Bank finds rising global temperatures will force 100 million more people into extreme poverty by 2030, and those in the poorest regions—sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia—will be hardest hit. The second from Climate Central notes as many as 760 million people may be left homeless by rising sea levels caused by a temperature increase of 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit from carbon emissions. An increase of only 3.6 degrees could reduce the number of people affected to 130 million over centuries. Asian cities, including Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Mumbai, are particularly at risk, though the US is the most threatened nation outside of Asia. About 25 million Americans could find their homes submerged, reports CNN.

Already 702 million people, or 9.6% of the world's population, are in extreme poverty, per the Guardian. Yet in Africa, food prices could rise 12% in the next 15 years as global crop yields could reduce by 5% by 2030 and 30% by 2080. Cases of diarrhea and stunting will also rise, while a global temperature increase of 3.6 degrees or more could put another 150 million people at risk of malaria, per Reuters. At the same time, those affected by droughts could jump 5% to 17% by 2030 and 50% to 90% by 2080. The report notes some $1 trillion for fast, climate-informed development is needed, along with continued efforts to reduce global emissions, but "ending poverty and fighting climate change cannot be done in isolation," a World Bank economist says. "The two will be much more easily achieved if they are addressed together."