'Stressed Out' Juror Sends 'Highly Unusual' Note to Judge
In New York corruption trial, she asked to be sent home after 2 hours
By Michael Harthorne,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 24, 2015 4:44 PM CST
An unnamed juror on the trial of former New York assemblyman Sheldon Silver claimed she was too "stressed out" to continue after less than two hours of deliberations.   (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

(Newser) – In a move the New York Times calls "highly unusual," a "stressed out" juror sent a note to the judge asking if she could go home after less than two hours of deliberations. "I don’t feel like I can be myself right now!" the note read in part. "I need to leave!” It came in the corruption trial against former New York State Assemblyman Sheldon Silver, which has been going on for three weeks. Silver is accused of taking millions in kickbacks in return for political favors, reports CBS New York. Jury deliberations started Tuesday, and that's when Judge Valerie Caproni received a note from an unnamed juror stating: “I am wondering if there is anyway I can be excused from this case, because I have a different opinion/view so far in this case and it is making me feel very, very uncomfortable," per the Times.

"My heart is pounding and my head feels weird," the note says. "I am so stressed out right now that I can’t even write normally." She adds that other jurors were accusing her of not using common sense. A second juror sent the judge a note saying that one member of the panel was having trouble determining whether it was, in fact, illegal for someone like Silver to accept money in exchange for favors. That note sought clarification on state rules, notes CBS. The prosecutor recommended the stressed-out juror be released, but the judge refused, saying it was "too early to throw in the towel." After receiving the note, Caproni reminded jurors they need to "respectfully exchange views" during deliberations. With the jury back at work, Jezebel is left with a few questions, including, "What did she think deliberations were?" and "How'd this happen in under two hours?" (It takes only one holdout juror to make a big difference.)
 

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
15%
12%
5%
2%
4%
62%