TMZ Has Crazy Story About an OJ Knife
If true, this could be huge
By Jenn Gidman, Newser Staff
Posted Mar 4, 2016 6:24 AM CST
Updated Mar 4, 2016 10:55 AM CST
In this May 14, 2013, file photo, OJ Simpson appears at a hearing in Clark County District Court in Las Vegas.   (Ethan Miller via AP, Pool)

(Newser) – Its sources are just that—"sources," with no more specific identifiers other than that they're in law enforcement—but TMZ has an incredible story about an allegedly hush-hush investigation being conducted by the LAPD in connection with a knife supposedly found on the perimeter of the former OJ Simpson estate. Per these insiders, a construction worker found what's said to be a folding buck knife years ago, possibly when the estate was razed in 1998. He immediately handed it off to an off-duty cop who, as the story goes, is said to have secretly taken it home. The officer not only allegedly kept it for years but tried to frame it, which is when the TMZ story says the knife's existence came to light. Earlier this year, the now-retired officer reportedly asked a fellow cop to look up the official record number for the Nicole Brown Simpson/Ron Goldman murder case so he could engrave it on the frame.

Instead, the TMZ story goes, the perturbed fellow officer told his higher-ups, and the knife-holding officer was forced to turn it over to the LAPD. Hair, fingerprint, and DNA testing is reportedly happening, as part of a probe that has been deemed "top secret" by TMZ—the site says that as a security measure the new case has been logged into the police department's system separately from the murder case (which is still technically open, since Simpson was found not guilty). TMZ notes that under double jeopardy rules, OJ couldn't be found guilty even if the knife turns out to be a huge new piece of evidence. Per ABC7, the LAPD has confirmed it's testing a knife found on the property, though Capt. Andrew Neiman told NBC4 Friday morning it's investigating the report itself. The Los Angeles Times also reports tests are being done, but it cites an unnamed source. (Click to find out how Marcia Clark feels about watching The People v. OJ Simpson.)