5 Possible Running Mates for Clinton
Is the US ready for an all-female ticket?
By Luke Roney,  Newser Staff
Posted Apr 23, 2016 2:32 PM CDT
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes part in a discussion with women at a campaign stop in Pennsylvania.   (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

(Newser) – While the race for the Democratic presidential nomination remains "fluid," the Clinton camp, "confident enough of victory," has begun a search for possible VPs, according to the New York Times. Among the factors Hillary Clinton will need to consider in a running mate are whether the US is ready for an all-female ticket and whether she wants a "rising star or a seasoned hand." It's actually a conversation that has been going on for some two years, "and truthfully, longer," writes Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post. Per the Times, Clinton "cares less about ideological and personal compatibility than about picking a winner" who will create a sharp contrast to the Republican ticket. Both the Times and the Post are floating these five names as possible Clinton running mates:

  • Sherrod Brown: The senator from Ohio could help "secure the Buckeye State," per the Times. But, the Post notes, picking him puts a sought-after Senate seat in play.
  • Julian Castro: The federal housing secretary, says the Post, complements Clinton "in virtually every way, demographically speaking."
  • Tim Kaine: The senator from Virginia speaks Spanish and plays harmonica, per the Times, but may be "too obvious a pick to make a splash."
  • Amy Klobuchar: An "up and coming star," per the Post, the senator from Minnesota may be the female that the Clinton campaign has said will be on its shortlist of possible VPs
  • Tom Perez: The labor secretary is "well regarded in liberal circles, and he's Hispanic," the Post notes. On the downside, he's unknown, has no foreign policy experience, and isn't "young or handsome," a Politico profile observes.
And what about Elizabeth Warren? The Boston Globe digs into the pros and cons of that possibility.
 

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