After Brexit Vote, UK PM Announces Resignation
Trump says vote to leave EU is 'a great thing'
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 24, 2016 2:54 AM CDT
Updated Jun 24, 2016 5:09 AM CDT
Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron speaks outside 10 Downing Street, London, on Friday.   (Daniel Leal-Olivas/PA via AP)
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(Newser) – Britain is leaving the European Union, and David Cameron is leaving 10 Downing Street. The prime minister told reporters Friday morning that after the Leave victory in the Brexit vote, he is not the "captain" to steer the country through exit negotiations with the EU, the AP reports. Cameron—who choked back tears as he spoke, reports Reuters—didn't give an exact date for his departure, but he said there should be a new leader in place by the time the Conservative Party holds a conference in October. He said the new leader should make the decision "about when to trigger Article 50 and start the process of leaving the EU." In other developments:

  • Donald Trump praised the referendum result when he arrived at his Trump Turnberry golf resort in Scotland Friday morning, the Guardian reports. He told reporters it was a "great thing" that the British had "taken back their country," adding that they have a lot in common with American voters. "They are angry over borders, they are angry over people coming into the country and taking over and nobody even noticing," he said. "They are angry about many, many things."

  • Boris Johnson, the maverick former London mayor who campaigned heavily for the Leave campaign, is now the odds-on favorite to succeed Cameron as prime minister. Before Thursday's vote, he tweeted that Britain should make the day "our Independence Day."
  • The BBC rounds up the reactions from EU leaders, who are calling for unity as well as reform in the face of demands for referendums in other countries. "Europe must be more operational, flexible, less bureaucratic, and much more perceptive to the diversity that its member states represent," said Czech PM Bohuslav Sobotka, who stressed that this "is not the end of the world and it's absolutely not the end of the EU."
  • The Brexit vote has led to renewed talk of splitting up the UK, the Guardian reports. In Scotland, where most voters supported staying in the EU, Scottish National Party leader Nicola Sturgeon is expected to call for a second independence referendum in a speech Friday.
  • A majority of voters in Northern Ireland also voted Remain, prompting Sinn Fein leader Martin McGuinness to call for a referendum on leaving the UK and joining with the Republic of Ireland, ITV reports.
  • Bloomberg reports on the fallout for financial markets. The British pound has plummeted to its lowest level since 1985, and the FTSE 100 index has taken its biggest hit since the financial crisis. Oil prices and currencies including the euro are also down, while gold prices and the yen have surged.

 

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