At EU-UK Powwow: Frayed Tempers, Insults
Brexit leader Nigel Farage tells MEPs they've never had real jobs
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 28, 2016 5:19 AM CDT
Updated Jun 28, 2016 6:39 AM CDT
European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, right, greets UKIP leader Nigel Farage during a special session of the European Parliament in Brussels.   (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)
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(Newser) – Britain needs to negotiate an exit deal with the European Union and it is not going to be the result of cozy backroom deals, European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker warned at a special session of the European Parliament on Tuesday. "We cannot allow a long period of uncertainty. There can be no secret negotiations. No notification, no negotiation," he said, per the BBC. Juncker said that as a European, he is saddened by the vote to leave, but the EU must respect the will of British voters. He turned on Brexit supporter and Independence Party leader Nigel Farage after Farage applauded the latter statement. "You were fighting for the exit, the British people voted in favor of the exit. Why are you here?" Juncker asked Farage. In other developments:

  • Farage was booed and jeered after making a speech in which he insulted his fellow members of the European Parliament and the whole European project, the Guardian reports. He told the MEPs that they were in denial about the EU and the euro failing, accused them of trying to bring in political union by stealth, and said none of them had "ever done a proper job" in their lives, let along created a job. He concluded by calling the Brexit vote a "seismic result" for world politics and predicting that the UK will not be the last country to leave the EU.

  • Reuters reports that despite President Obama's warning that the UK will be at the "back of the queue" for trade deals if it leaves the EU, the exit is unlikely to damage US-UK relations and US officials are now stressing that the "special relationship" will remain strong.
  • The Guardian reports that British PM David Cameron is in Brussels Tuesday for what will probably be very awkward talks with his European counterparts. He announced his resignation after the Brexit vote and is now widely expected to be gone by September.
  • Farage spoke to Fox News on Monday and slammed Obama as "disgraceful" for speaking out about the vote, unlike the "statesmanlike" Vladimir Putin, Politico reports.
  • The Washington Post looks at how the British vote highlights a crisis in confidence in democracies from Europe to Brazil to Japan. One of the biggest problems: People no longer believe things will get better.
  • The New York Times looks at the "chaotic paralysis" gripping Britain amid financial and political turmoil. There is increasing talk of forging a deal that would allow Britain to remain in a trading bloc with the EU, though EU leaders are expected to take a hard line in negotiations to discourage other leavers.