Winners, Losers From Day 1 of the DNC
Michelle Obama made the 'speech of the year,' analysts say
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Jul 26, 2016 4:44 AM CDT
Updated Jul 26, 2016 5:47 AM CDT
First lady Michelle Obama speaks during the first day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Monday.   (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
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(Newser) – There was no shortage of drama on Day 1 of the Democratic National Convention, though the day appeared to end with a more unified party, with Michelle Obama delivering what could be the convention's best speech and Bernie Sanders telling the Philadelphia crowd that Hillary Clinton "must become the next president." Here's who analysts say had a good day, or a terrible day.

Among the winners:

  • Michelle Obama. She didn't just give a great speech, she gave the "best speech of Hillary Clinton's career," according to Glenn Thrush at Politico. She "delivered a more passionate and concise case for Clinton than the candidate has ever made for herself—and perhaps the single most effective political address delivered in 2016," he writes.

  • Bernie Sanders. Some 14 months after he launched his campaign from the "outskirts of American politics," Sanders received a "hero's welcome" from an emotional crowd Monday night, writes Chris Cillizza at the Washington Post. His speech was "essentially a confirmation that he was right about almost everything and Clinton now understood that fact," Cillizza writes.
  • Sarah Silverman. Her off-the-cuff line to hecklers—"To the Bernie-or-bust people, you're being ridiculous"—got one of the night's biggest cheers. It came after what the Guardian calls "a thoughtful exposition of the argument for switching from Sanders to Hillary Clinton."
Among the losers:
  • Debbie Wasserman Schultz. The soon-to-be former Democratic National Committee chief had a terrible day by anybody's reckoning. She decided against opening the convention after she was heavily booed and heckled when speaking to Florida delegates Monday morning.
  • Cory Booker. The New Jersey senator tried a little too hard to launch himself on the national stage with his Monday night speech, which "felt too rehearsed, too plotted—and, without question, way, way too long," according to Cillizza at the Post. "The speech could have been half as long and twice as good."
  • The Trans-Pacific Partnership. The rhetoric against the trade deal from speakers like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders was almost indistinguishable from what Donald Trump has to say about it, despite the fact that it was negotiated by the sitting Democratic president, notes Dylan Matthews at Vox. He predicts that the deal will now die under either Clinton or Trump "if Obama can't push it through in the lame-duck session."