Here Are Some of the Biggest Losers of Election Night
Possibly the biggest: the media
By Evann Gastaldo,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 9, 2016 5:45 PM CST
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A man reaches for the New York Post newspaper featuring president-elect Donald Trump's victory, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 in New York.   (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

(Newser) – Other than the obvious, who and what were the biggest losers of election night? Various sources weigh in:

  • The media: Even before the big day, multiple outlets were decrying the media as the biggest loser of the election. Now that it's obvious just how wrong the media and most pollsters got it, more are echoing that sentiment.
  • The environment: Experts who spoke to Time and the Christian Science Monitor agreed that a Trump presidency could be bad news in terms of environmental activism. "When he assumes office, Trump will be the only head of state to deny that climate change is real," says the executive director of the Sierra Club.

  • Tesla? Barron's notes: "The Republicans and Mr. Trump haven’t exactly supported solar efforts, and Tesla is basically an alternative-energy play, particularly with its pending deal to buy SolarCity, an installer of residential solar panels. It’s hard to imagine the new government endorsing continued solar subsidies, which has boosted SolarCity in recent years."
  • #NeverTrump: The New Republic pointed out on Monday that not only did the #NeverTrump contingent of the Republican Party fail to rally most of the GOP to its cause, it actually may have helped Trump because it gave him "a convenient scapegoat to blame for the problems of his candidacy."
  • Russ Feingold: In a more traditional sense, the former Democratic senator was one of the biggest losers of the night, as The Hill reports he was "heavily favored" to beat Sen. Ron Johnson in Wisconsin, who booted him out of his Senate position back in 2010. Instead, in a "massive upset" that helped the GOP keep its Senate majority, Johnson held onto his seat.

 

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