Post-9/11 Muslim Registry May Return Under Trump
Adviser Kris Kobach, who helped write it for President Bush, floats idea
By John Johnson,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 17, 2016 11:43 AM CST
A file photo of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has been advising Donald Trump on immigration issues.   (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

(Newser) – How might Donald Trump translate his calls for restrictions on Muslim immigration into policy? One possibility is the reinstatement of a national registry of visitors from high-risk countries. The revelation comes from a Reuters interview of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who is known for his anti-immigration views within the GOP and who has been advising Trump since the campaign's early days. Kobach said Trump's transition team is considering dusting off the National Security Entry-Exit Registration System, which Kobach himself helped design as a member of George W. Bush's Justice Department in the wake of 9/11. Under the program, people from nations deemed high-risk had to undergo interrogations, fingerprinting, and, in some cases, periodic check-ins upon entering the US. The program, NSEERS, was abandoned in 2011.

"These programs had Kobach's signature all over them," the director of the Migration Policy Institute tells NBC News. "Now, the architect of the old program again has a seat at the table." Kobach, in fact, is rumored to be on Trump's list of attorney general candidates, reports McClatchy. Meanwhile, a spokesman for a pro-Trump super PAC has drawn attention for saying the mass internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII could serve as a model for Trump's policy on Muslim immigrants. "We've done it based on race, we've done it based on religion, we've done it based on region," Carl Bigbie of the Great America PAC told Fox News, per Politico. “Come on, you’re not proposing we go back to the days of internment camps, I hope,” responded Megyn Kelly. “I’m not proposing that at all,” Higbie responded. "But I’m just saying there is precedent for it."
 

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
3%
8%
8%
29%
39%
14%