Bad News for Brad in Custody Fight
Judge denies request to seal documents
By Evann Gastaldo,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 7, 2016 6:10 PM CST
In this Jan. 15, 2007 file photo, Brad Pitt, and actress Angelina Jolie arrive for the 64th Annual Golden Globe Awards in Beverly Hills, Calif.   (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill, File)

(Newser) – Brad Pitt filed a request to seal details of his child custody dispute with Angelina Jolie, but at an emergency hearing Wednesday, a judge denied that request, TMZ reports. Earlier this week, Jolie filed documents that spelled out details of her temporary custody agreement with Pitt, an agreement that requires Pitt only have monitored visits with the kids. Those documents revealed that a psychologist specializing in child custody issues is the one who makes the call as to when and how Pitt can see the couple's six children, and that Pitt has agreed to undergo random alcohol and drug testing four times a month. Sources tell TMZ Pitt's request to seal the custody dispute details was a direct response to her filing of those documents.

Jolie sources say she filed the document because she fears Pitt is going to attempt to be allowed to see the children with no monitoring, but Pitt sources say he's made no such move and that the filing publicized details of the custody dispute for no reason other than to air the couple's dirty laundry in public, hurting Pitt—but also causing their kids unnecessary pain. Some sources connected to the case say that since Pitt was cleared of wrongdoing by the Department of Children and Family Services, he wants solo time with the kids, and that he's been acting like a "celebrity who is used to getting whatever he wants" and trying to "push past the process" in order to get that solo time. Other sources, predictably, deny that. And then there are the sources who told TMZ this week that Jolie has been plotting for more than a year for how to get out of the marriage, take the kids to London, and work for the UN.

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
10%
8%
28%
2%
3%
50%