Obama: Senate Health Bill Just a 'Transfer of Wealth'
He attacks 'fundamental meanness' of plan
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 23, 2017 5:05 AM CDT
Updated Jun 23, 2017 6:40 AM CDT
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., center, accompanied by Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., right, arrive at a news conference Thursday.   (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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(Newser) – Barack Obama and other Democrats have weighed in on the Senate GOP's health plan, and the word they're using the most is "mean." In a Facebook post Thursday, the former president slammed the "fundamental meanness" of the Senate bill, saying that instead of being a health bill, it is "a massive transfer of wealth from middle-class and poor families to the richest people in America." "If there's a chance you might get sick, get old, or start a family—this bill will do you harm," warned Obama, telling senators that their rationale for acting on the issue should be more than just "undoing something that Democrats did." In other developments:

  • Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer also used the word "mean," echoing President Trump's remark on the House version of ObamaCare repeal, the Hill reports. "The Senate version of 'TrumpCare' is even meaner than the House bill," Schumer said. "The bill takes dollars out of healthcare for millions of Americans and puts them right back in the pocket of the wealthy."

  • The Washington Post looks at four scenarios that could kill the bill. The one seen as most likely involves the four most conservative senators refusing to vote for the bill because it doesn't do enough to undo ObamaCare. The GOP can only afford to lose two votes.
  • "I am very supportive of the Senate #HealthcareBill," Trump tweeted. "Look forward to making it really special! Remember, ObamaCare is dead."
  • Analysts say the bill is more generous to the health care industry than expected. After it was unveiled, health industry stocks on the S&P 500 rose 1.1% to an all-time high, reports Reuters.
  • Politico looks at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's tough task of cobbling 50 votes together. Insiders say that if anyone can do it, he can, though the hardest part will be winning over at least two of the four conservative senators who have already voiced opposition: Sens. Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, and Ron Johnson.
  • Vox looks at the different groups of people likely to lose out if the bill become law. Topping the list: People who gained Medicare coverage under ObamaCare.
  • The AP compares the Senate bill to the House bill and to ObamaCare, looking at issues including the age factor, taxation, and the opioid crisis.

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