Gwyneth's Goop Gets Called Out Over NASA Claim
No, Body Vibes stickers do not use NASA spacesuit material
By Evann Gastaldo,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 23, 2017 10:36 AM CDT
In this Jan. 26, 2016, file photo, Gwyneth Paltrow poses for photographers before Chanel's Spring-Summer 2016 Haute Couture fashion collection in Paris.   (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

(Newser) – Would you spend $60 for 10 stickers? No? What if you could wear those stickers to "rebalance the energy frequency" of your body? That's what Body Vibes stickers can do for you, according to a blurb promoting them on Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop website. That same blurb also used to claim that the stickers are "made with the same conductive carbon material NASA uses to line space suits so they can monitor an astronaut’s vitals during wear," but that line has recently changed after a Gizmodo report. NASA does not use "any conductive carbon material lining" on its spacesuits, a rep told Gizmodo. Rather, the suits are made of synthetic polymers, spandex, and other materials.

"Based on the statement from NASA, we've gone back to the company to inquire about the claim and removed the claim from our site until we get additional verification," a statement from Goop reads. The site's blurb recommending Body Vibes still says they "come pre-programmed to an ideal frequency, allowing them to target imbalances," and will "fill in the deficiencies in your reserves, creating a calming effect" while also helping to "clear skin by reducing inflammation and boosting cell turnover." The Body Vibes website itself, however, still includes a NASA claim, stating that the stickers "use an exclusive material originally developed for NASA." A former chief scientist at NASA had this to say to Gizmodo: "Wow. What a load of BS this is." (Let us not forget that Goop also once recommended ladies put $55 stone eggs in their vaginas.)

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