Trump Will Kill DACA: Report
Sources say he'll end Obama-era program, but with a 6-month delay
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Sep 4, 2017 6:21 AM CDT
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In this Aug. 15, 2017, file photo, a woman holds up a signs in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, during an immigration reform rally at the White House. After months of delays, President Trump is expected to decide soon on the fate of so called “dreamers.”   (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

(Newser) – President Trump is expected to announce that he will end protections for young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children, but with a six-month delay, reports the AP. The delay in the formal dismantling of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, would be intended to give Congress time to decide whether it wants to address the status of the so-called Dreamers legislation, according to two people familiar with Trump's thinking. What's not immediately clear, per the New York Times, is whether Congress could actually reach a compromise, how the six-month delay would work, or what would happen to people who have work permits or whose permits expire during the six months. The president, who has been grappling with the issue for months, has been known to change his mind and could still shift course. The plan was reported by Politico on Sunday evening.

The Obama-era DACA program has given nearly 800,000 young immigrants a reprieve from deportation and the ability to work legally. The move would come as the White House faces a Tuesday deadline set by GOP state officials threatening to sue the administration if Trump did not end the program. It also would come as Trump digs in on his base as he finds himself with poll numbers at near-record lows. During his campaign, Trump slammed DACA as illegal "amnesty" and vowed to eliminate it the day he took office. But since his election, Trump has wavered, at one point telling the AP that those covered could "rest easy." In February, he said the topic was "a very, very difficult subject for me, I will tell you. To me, it's one of the most difficult subjects I have." All the while, his administration continued to process applications and renew DACA permits, to the dismay of immigration hard-liners.

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