Secret Service Reportedly Has One Less Trump to Protect
Seeking privacy, president's son ditched Secret Service protection as of last week
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Sep 19, 2017 7:33 AM CDT
In this Nov. 16, 2016, photo, Donald Trump Jr. walks from the elevator at Trump Tower in New York.   (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

(Newser) – Donald Trump Jr. wants his privacy so much that, as of last week, he's given up his Secret Service protection, sources tell the New York Times and CNN. It's not clear whether his wife, Vanessa, and five children are also giving up their protections (though Fox News says Vanessa is), but the Times notes that not having Trump Jr. in its sights will mean "relief" for the Secret Service, which has been stretched thin by the big job of protecting President Trump's large extended family. The New York Daily News notes both Trump Jr. and brother Eric have traveled to places like Dubai and Vancouver with their security detail, which some have criticized as a burden on taxpayers. One source, however, tells CNN that Trump Jr. giving up his protections is a "huge risk" and "stupid decision," while an ex-member of former President Obama's detail tells the Washington Post the move is "shocking" and "negligent."

Sources tell CNN Trump Jr. "demanded" the Secret Service back off during a family trip to the Bahamas in June, despite the Secret Service "strongly [pushing] back" on that request. The Secret Service is required to protect the president's immediate family, unless it's told not to. The agency is staying mum. "To ensure the safety and security of our protectees and their families, we will not confirm who is currently receiving Secret Service protection," a spokeswoman says. The president's other children will reportedly keep their Secret Service protections, but one West Wing staffer is following Trump Jr.'s move: Kellyanne Conway, who'd been receiving Secret Service protection per the president's mandate after she received death threats when she first started working in the White House; those threats have since apparently died down, a source tells the Times.

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