Maker Resumes Bump Stock Sales Month After Shooting
Fate of legislation aiming to ban or regulate devices is unclear
By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 2, 2017 9:19 AM CDT
A device called a "bump stock" is seen attached to a semi-automatic rifle in Utah.   (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
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(Newser) – Despite a bipartisan cry to review or ban bump stocks in the aftermath of the Las Vegas shooting, in which the rapid-fire devices were used in the slaughter of 58 people, no legislation regarding bump stocks has advanced past the proposal stage in Congress. And though a popular maker of bump stocks, Slide Fire Solutions, opted to "temporarily suspend" new orders following the shooting, the company resumed taking orders Wednesday, exactly a month after the worst mass shooting in modern US history, report Newsweek and the Trace. The bump stock models now available from Slide Fire, starting at $180, give rapid-fire capabilities to AR-15 rifles. "We would like to take the time to thank all of our customers for their patience and support throughout this past month!" an email promotion reads.

This doesn't mean the banning or regulation of bump stocks is off the table. A bipartisan bill introduced in the House Tuesday would require background checks and fingerprinting for bump stock buyers, who would also be required to pay $200 to register their devices with the proper authorities. "Anyone who wants a device that modifies a firearm to shoot hundreds of rounds per minute should undergo thorough background checks and oversight," says Rep. Dina Titus, a Las Vegas Democrat who co-authored the bill, per the Hill. Another bipartisan House bill aims to ban bump stocks outright, per Newsweek. But as CNN notes, "gun control legislation has failed to make any progress in Congress after each mass shooting, and the Las Vegas massacre appears to be no different."

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