FCC Votes Down Obama-Era 'Net Neutrality' Rules
A 3-2 vote along party lines
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Dec 14, 2017 12:35 PM CST
Lindsay Chestnut of Baltimore holds a sign that reads "I like My Internet Like I Like my Country Free & Open" as she protests near the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), in Washington, Thursday,...   (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

(Newser) – The Federal Communications Commission has voted on party lines to undo sweeping Obama-era "net neutrality" rules that guaranteed equal access to the internet, the AP reports. The agency's Democratic commissioners dissented in the 3-2 vote Thursday. The FCC's new rules could usher in big changes in how Americans use the internet. The agency got rid of rules that barred companies like Comcast, AT&T, and Verizon from playing favorites with internet apps and sites.

The broadband industry promises that the internet experience isn't going to change. But protests have erupted online and in the streets as everyday Americans worry that cable and phone companies will be able to control what they see and do online. Net-neutrality supporters plan legal challenges. Some Democrats hope to ride that wave of public opinion into the 2018 elections.

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