Wolff's Take on 'Anomalous' Trump: 'Is Something Wrong?'

'Fire and Fury' author has more to say on president in new 'Guardian' interview
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Jan 15, 2018 10:15 AM CST
In this April 12, 2017, file photo, Michael Wolff speaks at the Newseum in Washington.   (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

(Newser) – Michael Wolff continues to make the media rounds to chat about his White House exposé Fire and Fury, and his latest sit-down was with the Guardian, which he hosted at his NYC apartment. Wolff (a co-founder of Newser) says the revelations in his book are "all explosive," and that's because the main player they're tied to, President Trump, is "so anomalous, so not what he's supposed to be. … Everything he does is at some level preposterous." Wolff says that while he can't offer an actual clinical diagnosis on the president's mental state, he can say, based on his experience and those he interviewed, that Trump is "deeply unpredictable, irrational, at times bordering on incoherent, self-obsessed in a disconcerting way, and displays all those kinds of traits that anyone would reasonably say, 'What's going on here, is something wrong?'"

Wolff also weighs in on the notion that Trump is a master negotiator—"Negotiation requires detailed understanding. ... He can't do it"—and addresses how he was able to get the story that no one else could. "They're stuck in the weeds," he says of US reporters. "I'm clearly not stuck in the weeds. … I got to a truth that no one else had gotten to." Wolff, who notes he's more interested in powerful people than in politics, says his newfound status hasn't led to much of a lifestyle change, other than more tightly closed shutters at home and more selfie requests. "This experiment happened," he says, explaining the experiment was "let's make someone president who is different and in every way the exact opposite of everything we think a president is and should be." The one good thing from it all, according to Wolff? "People have realized the experiment has been a failure," he says. Much more from Wolff in the Guardian.

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