$1.2M in Wine Allegedly Stolen by Someone Exec Trusted

Indictment alleges personal assistant swiped wine from Goldman Sachs' co-president
By Kate Seamons,  Newser Staff
Posted Jan 18, 2018 7:00 AM CST
In this Oct. 16, 2014, file photo, a screen at a trading post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange is juxtaposed with the Goldman Sachs booth. The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. reports earnings Wednesday,...   (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

(Newser) – It sounds like a good gig: working as the personal assistant for—and managing the stunning wine collection of—the No. 2 man at Goldman Sachs. But as the New York Times reports, Nicolas De-Meyer allegedly turned a good thing bad. Per an indictment unsealed Wednesday in Manhattan federal court, De-Meyer is accused of stealing and then hawking $1.2 million of rare wine from Goldman co-president David Solomon. The 40-year-old De-Meyer was tasked with accepting wine shipments at Solomon's Manhattan residence (which, per Bloomberg, can hold 1,000 bottles) and transporting them to his boss' East Hampton wine cellar. Instead, De-Meyer allegedly called himself "Mark Miller" and sold hundreds of bottles to a North Carolina wine dealer out of the Manhattan apartment.

Among the disposed-of bottles were seven bottles of Domaine de la Romanée-Conti, originally bought for $133,650 and described as one of the best and rarest wines in the world. CNBC reports that theft allegedly occurred in October 2016; De-Meyer, who had worked for Solomon since 2008, was fired the next month. Bloomberg quotes a source as saying De-Meyer then traveled abroad, which slowed the investigation. He was arrested Tuesday at Los Angeles International Airport and faces up to 10 years on the charge of interstate transportation of stolen property. Per the New York Daily News, the theft allegedly began in 2014. The Times notes it wasn't stated how much money was made off the wine sales, or how the bottles' disappearance came to light. (This wine theft involved the catacombs of Paris.)

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