Revenge Porn Law Ruled Unconstitutional
Meanwhile, the first lawsuit has been filed under New York's similar law
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Apr 22, 2018 3:00 PM CDT
A Texas court has struck down the state's revenge porn law   (Getty)

(Newser)

A Texas appeals court says a state law that punishes those who post intimate images from previous or current relationships online without consent is unconstitutional. Per the AP, the 12th Court of Appeals in Tyler ruled Wednesday that the revenge porn law violates the US Constitution by restricting expression based on the content of photographs and videos shared online. The court said that the law was vague and infringed on the rights of third parties who might unwittingly share intimate images. The court also ordered a revenge porn charge to be dropped against Jordan Bartlett Jones. Court records show Jones challenged the law as unconstitutional while awaiting trial for sharing a naked photograph of a woman without consent.

Meanwhile, a lawsuit has been filed for the first time in New York under that state's revenge porn law. City University of New York professor Dr. Spring Chenoa Cooper alleges her ex-boyfriend used social media to share intimate photos of her alongside her faculty picture from the CUNY website. The civil suit, filed this month in Manhattan Supreme Court, alleges comedian Ryan Broems shared three photos of Cooper on Tumblr, reports the New York Post. Cooper filed the case April 13 under the state's new law, which took effect in February. Sharing a person's compromising photos without consent has since been a misdemeanor in New York, punishable by up to a year in jail, up to $1,000 in fines, or both, CNN reported last year.

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