scientific study

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Clouds Aren't Where They Used to Be

Shifting patterns don't bode well for planet, say scientists

(Newser) - The clouds are shifting, and a new study suggests that's a worrisome thing for the planet. Satellite images collected between 1983 and 2009 show two trends: Clouds have been migrating away from the Equator toward the Earth's poles, and the tops of those clouds are reaching higher into... More »

Flying East Is a Pain for Your Brain

Biological clock prefers a longer day achieved by flying west: study

(Newser) - A flight from Paris to New York is easier on the brain than one from New York to Paris, according to a new study that finds jet lag is based not only on distance traveled, but also the direction of travel. In the journal Chaos , researchers from the University of... More »

Eating Fruits and Veggies Will Boost Your Happiness

After about 2 years

(Newser) - An apple a day keeps the blues away? According to a new study , eating fruits and vegetables increases happiness. "However," researcher Andrew Oswald tells the New York Daily News , "French fries will not count." Researchers from England's University of Warwick and the University of Queensland... More »

Weird Study Says You Shouldn't Drink Coffee After a Concert

It could slow your ears' healing: scientists

(Newser) - Scientists who were apparently in desperate need of a research topic have a tip for concert-goers: Don't drink coffee for a while afterward. Based on their new study , it could hurt your hearing. How does one go about studying such a thing? Well, scientists at the McGill University Auditory... More »

Scientists Find a Mouse That Gets Periods

Spiny mouse could help in researching human conditions

(Newser) - Just 1.5% of mammals menstruate and 99.9% of those are primates. That's why scientists are amazed by the spiny mouse—the first rodent shown to menstruate with a cycle remarkably similar to humans, according to a study that still needs to be peer-reviewed. Researchers at Monash University... More »

Your Wine Glass Could Be Getting You Drunk

Large glasses encourage people to drink more, faster: study

(Newser) - There may be an easy way to limit how much wine you drink: drink from a small glass. In what the Daily Express reports is important news for anyone who'd rather their guests not guzzle their entire wine stash, University of Cambridge scientists found drinking wine from large glasses... More »

Strong Chemo Plus Stem Cell Transplant May Halt MS

Study used extremely small sample size, but results are encouraging

(Newser) - The sample size was quite small, but research on patients with multiple sclerosis shows promising results on stopping the progression of the incurable disease that causes the immune system to attack the coating around nerve fibers (and the fibers themselves) in the brain and spinal cord, the BBC reports. Per... More »

Your Fish Might Recognize You

Archerfish shown to distinguish between human faces

(Newser) - Be careful who you call "fishbrain." The insult might actually be a compliment, based on a new study in Scientific Reports . For the first time, scientists have discovered that a species of fish can distinguish between human faces—something once thought possible only among primates with large, complex... More »

Smog Is Bad for Your Blood Pressure, Too

Stay inside on smoggy days, scientist suggests

(Newser) - You probably don't need another reason to dislike smog, but here goes anyway: It can raise your blood pressure. "We discovered a significant risk of developing high blood pressure due to exposure to air pollution," such as coal burning, vehicle exhaust, and dirt and dust in the... More »

Scientists Aim to Grow Human Organs in Farm Animals

But critics say 'chimera embryos' are an ethical mess

(Newser) - A handful of scientists may be blurring the line between human and animal as they work toward creating embryos that are a combination of both, NPR reports. Their goal is to grow human organs in farm animals for transplant into terminally ill patients—but the work is "ethically charged,... More »

Goal of Clinical Trial: Reverse Human Death

Researchers hope to revive brains of the clinically dead

(Newser) - Scientists are predicting "the eventual reversal of death in our lifetime," and a new clinical trial could take us one step closer to that goal. The National Institutes of Health has approved "the first trial of its kind" by US biotech company Bioquark to attempt to revive... More »

There's an Upside for Women Who Get Cheated On

'Higher mating intelligence'

(Newser) - Having a relationship end because of an unfaithful partner can be devastating. But a new study suggests that women who lose their significant other to another by way of infidelity "actually win in the long run" because the experience bestows "higher mating intelligence," according to a press... More »

Playing With Babies Helps Them Learn to Pay Attention

The longer a parent pays attention to something, the longer baby does: study

(Newser) - Want your child to have a good attention span? You can help them to develop it starting at a young age, researchers say. A new study published in Current Biology finds that "when parents play with objects with their children," they help their children learn to sustain attention,... More »

OTC Painkiller May Make It Hard for You to Notice Errors

Past studies show acetaminophen can dull emotional pain

(Newser) - That Tylenol you just popped may do the trick when it comes to dulling your headache. But a new University of Toronto study finds that the painkiller's active ingredient, acetaminophen, may also put a damper on your ability to notice errors, Science Daily reports. "The core idea of... More »

Building Material of the Future: 'Transparent Wood'

It could be used for windows and solar cells

(Newser) - One of these days, your windows may be made out of wood. Swedish researchers have developed a transparent, wood-based material that could be used to let light into buildings, as well as for making solar cells, Science Daily reports. The transparent wood—the "coolest building material ever," per... More »

Regardless of Language, We All Understand This Face

The 'not face' is universal sign of disapproval: scientists

(Newser) - You've seen it when someone disagrees with you: a furrowed brow, tight lips, and raised chin. It's a face that means, basically, no—and it's actually universal. The same team of researchers that identified these 21 facial expressions say the "not face" is used so instinctively... More »

Addicted to Your Phone? Blame Your Personality

You might be impulsive and impatient: study

(Newser) - There's no denying that humans are mad for their cellphones, but some are clearly more attached than others—and scientists now have a clearer understanding of why. Generally speaking, people who constantly check their phones have a problem controlling impulses, period, and they're not so great at delayed... More »

Algorithm Can Spot If You're Tweeting While Drinking

It even knows if you're drinking at home

(Newser) - Think last night's drunk tweets were pretty coherent? You won't fool University of Rochester researchers, who have developed a machine-learning algorithm that can tell when a tweeter is drinking. To do so, they started with humans: Researchers collected tweets associated with alcohol—think ones with words like "... More »

A Supervolcano's Deadly Lava? You Might Outrun It

At least in a car—that ash and gas moves slowly, study says

(Newser) - Think supervolcanoes that devastate entire regions are terrifying? Well sure, but you might be able to outrun them—according to a study that says one prehistoric supervolcano churned out lava at only 10 to 45 miles per hour, Live Science reports. "It's really interesting how you can have... More »

World's Longest-Distance Flier Is Identified

Tiny dragonfly covers 4.4K miles between continents

(Newser) - The world's longest-distance flier is a fly—a dragonfly to be exact. That's what scientists at Rutgers University-Newark claim in a new genetic study of Pantala flavescens, also known as the wandering glider, per Discovery News . Populations of the dragonfly, which is only 1.5 inches long, have... More »

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