medical breakthrough

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Breakthrough Could Transform Vaccine Shots

New technology would allow for a single childhood shot

(Newser) - Potential good news for kids—and the parents who hate to watch them squirm when faced with a needle. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a technology that could allow childhood vaccines—for everything from polio to measles, mumps, and rubella—to be combined into a single... More »

It's a Breakthrough Cancer Drug—And It'll Cost You

Novartis CEO stands by $475K charge for Kymriah

(Newser) - "The cancer world is forever changed." That's what a researcher is saying following the FDA's approval of America's first-ever treatment that genetically alters a person's cells to fight cancer. The customized treatment to be administered at certified medical centers involves drawing a patient's... More »

In Possible World First, Heart Surgery Saves Baby in Womb

Doctors in Canada perform in utero balloon atrial septoplasty

(Newser) - Doctors in Canada are patting themselves on the back after what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind heart surgery that saved the life of an unborn child. Halfway through her pregnancy, Kristine Barry of Barrie, Ont., learned her unborn son had a heart defect in which the two main arteries... More »

US Breakthrough in Womb Transplants Offers New Hope

1 of 4 living donor transplants at Baylor looks promising

(Newser) - America's first uterus transplant might have failed , but doctors are "cautiously optimistic" that one of the country's first living donor womb transplants could be a success. Surgeons at Baylor University Medical Center say they performed the living donor transplants on four women, aged 20 to 35—each... More »

Cancer Treatment Yields 'Unprecedented' Results

Advanced leukemia patients go into remission

(Newser) - They were leukemia patients with months to live and nothing to lose, so researchers tried a novel therapy involving the engineering of the patients' own cells. Result? For 94% of participants, their symptoms disappeared, reports the Guardian . For those with other types of blood cancers, the response rate was a... More »

Daily Injections Could Be Thing of Past for Diabetics

Novel new treatment for type 1 diabetes called 'very promising'

(Newser) - A new treatment going through clinical trials could mean the end of daily insulin injections for diabetics—and could even have huge benefits for people suffering from arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, and obesity, the Independent reports. "This could be a game-changer," one University of California, San Francisco, researcher says... More »

Scientists Might've Just Revolutionized Brain Medicine

Canadian scientists breach blood-brain barrier for first time

(Newser) - Inside your head, there's something called the blood-brain barrier—a natural defense system that keeps germs in your bloodstream from entering your brain. While it's great when it comes to preventing bacterial infections, the barrier makes treating some brain diseases impossible, since it prevents drugs from reaching the... More »

Man Gets First-of-Its-Kind Implant to Stop Back Pain

It confuses brain with electric currents to produce pleasant tingling instead of pain

(Newser) - Sixty-year-old Joe Grewal has had chronic back pain for half his life. Back surgery didn't help. Neither did a morphine implant. But this week he underwent a first-ever procedure that's left him "feeling great," reports the Australian Broadcasting Corporation . Doctors at Australia's Royal North Shore... More »

Discovery of Hidden Vessel in Brain Called 'Stunning'

It may rewrite textbooks on immune system, has implications for Alzheimer's

(Newser) - It may not sound like much to those without neuroscience degrees: A researcher at the University of Virginia spotted a lymphatic vessel while studying the brain of a mouse. But the reason words like " stunning ," " dazzling ," and " landmark " are being used to describe the... More »

'Sweet Tooth' May Be 'Achilles' Heel' of HIV

Researchers block virus from feeding on sugar, starve it to death

(Newser) - Imagine you're hankering for a snack, but your refrigerator is chained up. Now imagine you're the HIV virus, and inside your fridge is the food you need to grow and spread. A new study from Northwestern Medicine and Vanderbilt University provides the chains: Researchers say they've found... More »

World's First 'Dead Heart' Transplants Successful

Aussie breakthrough could save the lives of 30% more heart transplant patients

(Newser) - For 20 years, the heart transplant unit at Sydney's St. Vincent's Hospital has been working hard to figure out a way to transplant a dead heart into a live patient. Today doctors from the team announced their work had paid off: They have successfully completed three transplants using... More »

Medical History: First Womb-Transplant Baby

Swedish team reports milestone

(Newser) - A woman in Sweden gave birth to a healthy baby boy last month, an otherwise ordinary event that is making international headlines for good reason: The woman who gave birth was herself born without a womb. Doctors fixed that with a womb transplant earlier this year, leading to last month'... More »

Schizophrenia Isn't Actually One Disease

Genetic research points to 8 disorders

(Newser) - Genetic research is paving the way to a "new era" in psychiatry, a researcher says, and that includes a different way of looking at schizophrenia: It's not one disease, but rather eight different ones, divided by their genetic profiles, a study suggests. Researchers reviewed genetic data from 4,... More »

Quadriplegic Moves Hand by Thinking About It

Ian Burkhart broke his neck while swimming in 2010

(Newser) - It is, as the Washington Post writes, "science fiction come true": A 23-year-old quadriplegic managed to move his right hand last Wednesday, a hand that he'd had no power over since he broke his neck after diving into a sandbar in the Atlantic Ocean in 2010. Since then,... More »

Breakthrough DNA Test Saves Boy in 48 Hours

New software sifts through DNA sample to make quick diagnosis

(Newser) - A 15-year-old boy is alive thanks to a diagnosis that sounds like it’s from a sci-fi novel. Doctors took a DNA sample from Joshua Osborn—whose brain was swelling with fluid for reasons that had doctors stumped—ran it through DNA-sequencing machines, and let the software work its magic,... More »

This 46-Year-Old Woman's Baby Set a Record

Belinda Slaughter gave birth via IVF, using her own fresh eggs

(Newser) - A 46-year-old Florida woman became a new mom to a healthy baby boy last year via IVF—and though it's not unheard of for a woman to deliver a baby at her age, what's medically remarkable is that Belinda Slaughter didn't use frozen or donated embryos, but... More »

Constipation Solution: a Vibrating Pill?

Study: Capsule could work for those who are unsatisfied with laxatives

(Newser) - Here's a novel idea that could literally shake up the way that millions of people treat constipation: a pill that vibrates when swallowed, rather than delivering medication. The capsule, which is being developed by the Israeli company Vibrant , is the size of a multivitamin and works by mimicking the... More »

Eyes of the Dead Could Help Living See

Cell transplants restore brain, eye connection

(Newser) - A new technique could dramatically improve the ways in which the eyes of the dead can help restore sight to the blind, according to research published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine . Researchers extracted a type of adult stem cell from the back of donated eyes and found that... More »

Food Poisoning May Trigger Multiple Sclerosis

Study suggests that a toxin plays a role

(Newser) - Scientists still don't know what causes multiple sclerosis, but new research suggests that a particular strain of food poisoning may play a role, reports the BBC . The food bacterium in question is called Clostridium perfringens, which NBC News notes is responsible for millions of cases of foodborne illnesses per... More »

Look Out, Cancer Cells, Here Come 'Sticky Balls'

Cornell researchers develop promising technique to keep tumors from spreading

(Newser) - It sounds ingenious: Cornell researchers have created roving proteins whose sole purpose is to destroy cancer cells in the bloodstream. If further tests hold up, this could offer a way to keep cancers from metastasizing, or spreading, reports the BBC , which uses the phrase "cancer-killing sticky balls" to describe... More »

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