discoveries

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Human Embryos Just Survived 13 Days in a Petri Dish

Opens the door to study what happens in the mysterious, critical first days of life

(Newser) - It's a milestone that's at once being called groundbreaking and a Pandora's box: Scientists at Cambridge University surprised even themselves by growing embryos for 13 days outside the womb—one day short of a longstanding legal limit that's simply never been pushed up against because embryos... More »

For Insomnia, Toss the Sleeping Pills, Try Therapy

It may require more work, but researchers say the evidence supports pursuing therapy over pills

(Newser) - The American College of Physicians is issuing new guidelines on how to treat insomnia based on evidence suggesting that the side effects of sleeping pills are "underestimated," while the success of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT-I) is compelling. "The evidence is quite strong that cognitive behavioral therapy is... More »

Study Determines How Many Best Friends We Have

4 ... or maybe 5

(Newser) - British anthropologist Robin Dunbar made a name for himself in the '90s when he hypothesized that there is a strong correlation among primates between brain size and social circles—and he most notably suggested that we humans can only really maintain close relationships with five people, reports MIT Technology... More »

'One of the Most Important Shipwrecks' May Be Found

James Cook's Endeavour may have been located in RI's Newport Harbor

(Newser) - The Rhode Island Marine Archaeology Project calls it "one of the most important shipwrecks in world history," an 18th-century ship so distinct that it and its captain are said to have served as an inspiration for Star Trek—and the Endeavour may finally have been found. Explorer Capt.... More »

Why Astronomers Named This Comet After a Cat

C/2014 S3, now a 'Manx comet,' has no tail

(Newser) - The discovery was so unusual that at first astronomers didn't know what to call it. A comet bearing the official name C/2014 S3 also bore no tail—which isn't just unusual, but the first ever to be observed by humans, reports Reuters . Moreover, it was dark and rocky,... More »

Ancient Proof of Mother's Love Unearthed in Taiwan

4,800-year-old human fossil is of mother, baby

(Newser) - Archaeologists in Taiwan were "shocked" to unearth a 4,800-year-old human fossil of a mother cradling an infant in her arms. The discovery, among 48 sets of remains excavated from graves in the Taichung area, represents the earliest trace of human activity in central Taiwan, according to Reuters . "... More »

6 States With Most Mental Illness

West Virginians especially struggle with it

(Newser) - Nearly 10 million Americans experience a serious mental illness within any one year, and 24/7 Wall St. outlines the 12 states that have the largest adult populations struggling with various forms of mental illness, including depression and bipolar disorder. To come up with this ranking, the site examined surveys administered... More »

Dog Hugs: 5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

Including distressing news for dog owners and secret Nazi treasure

(Newser) - A one-minute exercise routine? It's one of the discoveries to make headlines this week:
  • Science Says Your Dog Hates Being Hugged : Thanks to that old wet blanket known as science, we now have compelling evidence that your dog hates it when you hug him. A psychology professor who specializes
... More »

Playing With Babies Helps Them Learn to Pay Attention

The longer a parent pays attention to something, the longer baby does: study

(Newser) - Want your child to have a good attention span? You can help them to develop it starting at a young age, researchers say. A new study published in Current Biology finds that "when parents play with objects with their children," they help their children learn to sustain attention,... More »

Workers Laying Pipes Unearth Coins—1,300 Pounds of Them

Their mint condition suggests they were never in circulation

(Newser) - What should've been a simple maintenance project involving new water pipes in Spain has become something else entirely. Construction workers near Seville Wednesday stumbled upon about 1,300 pounds of bronze Roman coins from the third and fourth centuries crammed into 19 ancient amphoras, the AFP reports. The Washington ... More »

The Longer You Can Do This, the More Friends You May Have

The connection between friends and pain tolerance is explored

(Newser) - Having a healthy network of friends can do you a lot of good , but can it also save you from a lot of pain? Researchers reporting in the journal Scientific Reports seem to think so. They say that one's ability to tolerate pain can actually predict the size of... More »

6 Best US Cities for Lazy People

Florida is the place to be

(Newser) - Too bad moving involves getting off the couch. Realtor.com has found the 10 best US cities "where lazy folks can thrive," based on several factors, including average sleep and work hours, the number of spas and hot tubs, access to services like dog walking and grocery delivery,... More »

Study Names Worst State for Drunk Driving

It's North Dakota, though Montana isn't great, either

(Newser) - Be careful on the roads in North Dakota. The state is the most dangerous in the country when it comes to drunk driving, according to an analysis by CarInsuranceComparison.com . It considered five factors: a state's drunk-driving-related deaths and arrests in 2015, its penalties and laws, and its cost... More »

Study: Minute of Hard Exercise Just as Good as 45-Minute Workout

Science has some good news for a change

(Newser) - "Most people cite 'lack of time' as the main reason for not being active," professor of kinesiology Martin Gibala says in a press release . But that's no longer a valid excuse for not getting in better shape. According to a study published Tuesday in PLOS One,... More »

Science: Your Dog Hates Being Hugged

Sorry, dog lovers

(Newser) - Thanks to that old wet blanket known as science, we now have compelling evidence that your dog hates it when you hug him. Dr. Stanley Coren, a professor of psychology specializing in canine behavior, says dogs nearly always show signs of stress or anxiety when being embraced, the San Francisco ... More »

Harper Lee Biographer Unearths Her Article on Killings

She wrote about 'Cold Blood' case for an FBI magazine, before Capote's book

(Newser) - Harper Lee's biographer has dug up another piece of writing by the late author, but this time it's a magazine article instead of a controversial novel . Charles Shields has concluded that Lee is the author of an unsigned article about the notorious Clutter family murders in Kansas that... More »

Babies Fed Rice Cereal Have Far Higher Arsenic Levels

Move over rice, other grains may become more popular cereal

(Newser) - Feeding infants rice cereals as first foods is taking a new hit from researchers and organizations alike, and now a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics adds to the growing chorus that rice be scaled back or put off altogether. This is because, as researchers report, infants who are fed... More »

The Planet Is Getting Greener Thanks to Pollution

But that doesn't mean global warming is a good thing

(Newser) - Dozens of scientists were shocked to find a dramatic increase in plant life around the world over the past 33 years instead of the global-warming-related "browning" they expected to find in their analysis of satellite data, Australia's ABC reports. According to a press release , a study published Monday... More »

5 Worst Airlines for Customer Satisfaction

ACSI rankings based on everything from in-flight services to seat comfort

(Newser) - Spirit Airlines may not be flying high after seeing the results of this year's American Customer Satisfaction Index travel report . Although the airline scored 15% higher than it did last year, it still came in dead last, with a score of 62 out of 100, per CNNMoney . The rankings... More »

Study Finds HIV-Positive Men Age 5 Years Faster

That puts them at early risk of osteoporosis, heart disease, and more

(Newser) - HIV-positive people are aging faster than their HIV-negative peers, putting them at earlier risk of things like dementia, osteoporosis, and heart disease, according to a study published last week in Molecular Cell. Researchers looked at 26,927 DNA tags—called methylation—on the genomes of 137 HIV-positive men; these methylation... More »

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