discoveries

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New Frog Species Has Croak Unlike Any Other

Atlantic Coast leopard frog discovered in NY, NJ is a 'cryptic' species, scientists say

(Newser) - A few years ago, researcher Jeremy Feinberg was looking into why the New York City area's southern leopard frog had disappeared when he stumbled onto a strange call between a bunch of frogs on Staten Island. The chuck, chuck, chuck sound his team heard was definitely different from the... More »

Investigators: We've Got a Piece of Earhart's Plane

And it suggests she never crashed

(Newser) - A team investigating the disappearance of Amelia Earhart is reporting, with "increasing confidence," that it has managed to identify a piece of her plane that was retrieved in 1991. The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, or TIGHAR, says the part in question is a metal patch that... More »

700-Year-Old Viruses Found —in Frozen Caribou Poop

It seems the ice is remarkably good at preserving unsavory things

(Newser) - If trekking into the wilds of northern Canada, drilling samples out of the ice core, and analyzing caribou poop to find a pair of really old viruses sounds like your idea of a hot Friday night, well, we present you Eric Delwart. As NPR reports, the viral researcher did just... More »

Scientists Link 2 Genes to Violent Behavior

Criminals in Finland more likely to have mutated versions

(Newser) - A new study might be inching us closer to the possibility that the worst criminals can blame their behavior on bad genes. In the study of 900 convicts in Finland, researchers found that those with mutated forms of two genes were 13 times more likely to have a history of... More »

Why You Should Gamble Before You Chow Down

Hungry people might make better long-term decisions, researchers say

(Newser) - You know not to go grocery shopping on an empty stomach. But making complex decisions while your stomach's rumbling? Go for it, Utrecht University researchers say, claiming that hungry people might delay gratification and make better long-term choices, Pacific Standard reports. A study published in PLoS One conducted three... More »

Highest Ice Age Camp Found in Andes

Settlers in Peru got there earlier than thought

(Newser) - Archaeologists who found ancient settlements high up in the Peruvian Andes were surprised to learn that humans were there between 12,000 and 13,000 years ago. At nearly 3 miles above sea level, that makes them the "world's highest known Ice Age settlements," in the words... More »

The Future Is Now: Hoverboards Exist

And you can help fund them on Kickstarter

(Newser) - It is now officially the future: Hoverboards are real. A company called Arx Pax has developed a skateboard-style device that rides on air instead of wheels, and it's raising money to "perfect" the project on Kickstarter , Phys.org reports. Arx Pax has already surpassed its $250,000 goal.... More »

Unveiled: City Founded by Genghis Khan's Descendants

2 Christian temples discovered along Volga River

(Newser) - Working along Russia's Volga River, archeologists have discovered what's left of the 750-year-old city of Ukek, headed by the descendants of Genghis Khan. The researchers uncovered the city's Christian quarter, which was often visited by wealthy people; while some Christians were enslaved, the findings suggest that not... More »

5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

Including the world's first successful 'dead heart' transplants

(Newser) - A dinosaur with "horrible" hands and an ancient Ukrainian temple make the list:
  • Docs Transplant 'Dead Hearts' Into 3 Patients : An Australian heart transplant unit has been toiling for 20 years to transplant a "dead heart" (one that's not still beating in a brain-dead donor) into
... More »

Giant Snake Has Virgin Birth

Reticulated python had 6 babies, with no male in sight

(Newser) - Sorry, gents, you might be getting phased out of the reproduction loop—at least when it comes to the world's longest snakes. Thelma, a 200-pound, 20-foot-long reticulated python who lives at Kentucky's Louisville Zoo with her female roommate Louise, gave birth in 2012 to six female babies. This... More »

Antarctic Thaw Reveals Explorer's 100-Year-Old Journal

George Murray Levick described photos in old notebook

(Newser) - Surgeon, zoologist, and photographer George Murray Levick took part in a 1910-1913 Antarctic expedition as part of Captain Robert Falcon Scott's crew, and while Scott perished on a journey back from the South Pole, Levick made it off the continent alive. He didn't accompany Scott to the pole,... More »

World's First 'Dead Heart' Transplants Successful

Aussie breakthrough could save the lives of 30% more heart transplant patients

(Newser) - For 20 years, the heart transplant unit at Sydney's St. Vincent's Hospital has been working hard to figure out a way to transplant a dead heart into a live patient. Today doctors from the team announced their work had paid off: They have successfully completed three transplants using... More »

Sphinx's Missing Head Found Within Tomb

Archaeologists continue to unearth secrets of tomb at Amphipolis

(Newser) - In August, archaeologists in Greece announced they were about ready to enter what they say is the biggest ancient tomb ever unearthed in the country—which would mean passing by the two headless carved sphinxes that flank its entrance. Now those archaeologists say one of the missing sphinx heads has... More »

Scientists Introduce Bizarre Dinosaur

Meet Deinocheirus, even stranger than expected

(Newser) - A half-century ago, researchers found two arms in the Mongolian desert that clearly belonged to a big dinosaur—they were eight feet long and ended in nasty claws. But that was it, and so they named the mysterious creature Deinocheirus mirificus, which roughly translates into “unusual horrible hand,"... More »

Introverts, Avoid Coffee Before Big Meetings

It might do way more harm than good, says author

(Newser) - Introverts preparing for a big meeting might think that coffee beforehand will give them a needed jolt in performance. In fact, the opposite may be true, reports New York mag. The insight comes from a newly released book by psychologist Brian Little, who writes in Me, Myself, and Us that... More »

Humans Stayed Lactose Intolerant Long After Dawn of Dairy Operations

Trait showed up thousands of years after first cheese-making

(Newser) - Humans have been running relatively advanced dairy operations for more than 7,000 years—the first cheese dates back to then —so it seems logical to assume that human bodies have been able to process milk for just as long. Turns out, that assumption is off by thousands of... More »

Ancient Temple in Ukraine Is Full of Animal Bones

Ukraine site holds possible game pieces, hair decorations

(Newser) - Researchers working in Ukraine are revealing a stunning find: a temple that's older than the invention of writing, LiveScience reports. The temple of wood and clay, which measures 197 feet by 66 feet, contains lots of animal bones—perhaps the remains of animals sacrificed on the building's eight... More »

Scientists: Jack the Ripper ID Was Based on Error

They cite 'error of nomenclature'

(Newser) - Last month brought the news that Jack the Ripper had been identified , at least according to an amateur detective who claimed in a new book that DNA evidence from a blood-soaked shawl found near one of the victims pointed to a Polish immigrant named Aaron Kosminski. But Russell Edwards' claim... More »

New Batteries Take 2 Minutes to Recharge 70%

And they last 20 years

(Newser) - In a piece of good news for both the environment and impatient people, scientists in Singapore are announcing a rechargeable lithium-ion battery that takes only two minutes to reach a 70% charge. What's more, the batteries last about 20 years, Science Daily reports. The key to the quick charge... More »

Archaeologists Uncover Giant Sphinx in Calif. Dunes

Cecil B. DeMille buried 'Ten Commandments' set in the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes

(Newser) - Archaeologists parted the sands in California to excavate one of the last remnants of old-time Hollywood: a giant plaster sphinx from the set of Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments. The director buried props from the epic movie (the 1923 silent black-and-white version, not the 1956 Charlton Heston blockbuster)... More »

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