discoveries

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After Years Without Mate, Shark Makes Her Own Babies

It's the first time a shark has switched from sexual to asexual reproduction

(Newser) - Australia's Reef HQ aquarium had hoped to scale back its shark breeding program. Its female sharks had other ideas. Over the course of six years, Leonie the zebra or leopard shark had produced more than two dozen offspring before she was separated from her mate in 2012. But in... More »

Being Rude to Your Kid's Doctor May Be a Health Hazard

It can jeopardize the care children receive, a study found

(Newser) - If you think being tough with your child's doctor is the right way to ensure better care, think again. A new study out of the University of Florida suggests that rude parents can cause serious, even deadly, consequences. Researchers who staged emergency situations in a neonatal intensive care unit... More »

Vampire Bats Now Feasting on Human Blood

Scientists in Brazil say they're evolving because of a decline in birds

(Newser) - Human encroachment typically means bad news for a given species (recent examples include giraffes and cheetahs ), but one mammal appears to be fighting back. Researchers say the hairy-legged vampire bat has adapted surprisingly fast from drinking the blood of birds to that of humans to survive, reports the Telegraph ... More »

'Goldilocks Zone' Exists for Teens' Screen Time

New study finds there's a window of time spent on gadgets that can be beneficial

(Newser) - Tapping away on computers, smartphones, and other devices a few hours a day can have beneficial effects on children, a new study found. Despite hand-wringing among experts that kids are spending too much time in a virtual world, the latest research out of Oxford concludes that "moderate engagement …... More »

Filling Cavities: 5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

Including a surprising move by a monkey

(Newser) - A potential new way of filling cavities and a study sure to cheer those too busy to work out during the week were among the discoveries making headlines:
  • Alzheimer's Drug May Help Your Teeth : A novel therapy holds promise for changing the way dentists treat your cavities—they'd
... More »

Study: Kids Copy Superheroes' Aggression, Not Altruism

They may find it tricky to disentangle aggressive vs. helpful behaviors

(Newser) - A new study finds that children who are "highly engaged" with superheroes were more likely to be aggressive a year later. Researchers twice evaluated 240 preschoolers and kindergartners at four sites across the western US, analyzing their levels of three types of aggression at both points: physical (hitting, kicking),... More »

How Stress Turns Into a Physical Heart Attack

It involves a signal from your brain to your bone marrow

(Newser) - Scientists have long cautioned that stress is bad for the heart, and a new study provides insight into precisely why. In the Lancet , researchers lay out a chain of events: When people feel stress, the amygdala area of the brain—it processes emotions such as fear and danger—fires up... More »

Bad News: Booze Gives You the Munchies, Too

At least it does in lab mice

(Newser) - You might hear your stomach rumbling, telling you to fill it with something tasty, but the actual impulse to eat originates in the brain. Now researchers studying the brain cells responsible—called agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons—say that alcohol activates them, thereby triggering the urge to eat even though alcohol... More »

Cows Once as Big as Elephants May Soon Roam Europe

Welcome back the aurochs, or something like it

(Newser) - Standing nearly as tall as an elephant, the aurochs grazed for 250,000 years until its extinction in 1627. But its story may not end there: Scientists say they are close to resurrecting the "supercow," once the largest land mammal in Europe, reports CNN . In search of herbivores... More »

Lonely Deer-Humping Monkey Shocks Scientists, Internet

It's only the second time such a thing has been documented

(Newser) - One lonely snow monkey in Japan is taking animal sexuality to strange new places. In a study published Tuesday in Primates , researchers documented a monkey having or attempting sexual relations with at least two sika deer. While one of the deer ran off, the monkey mounted another deer and ejaculated... More »

Too Busy for Daily Workouts? That's OK

Study finds that 'weekend warriors' still reap benefits

(Newser) - Hate having to drag yourself to the gym after work? A new JAMA study suggests people who exercise only on the weekend enjoy much of the same benefits as weekday gym-goers. Researchers at Loughborough University in the UK who reviewed data on more than 63,500 mostly white adults found... More »

'Ancient' Signal Dictates Where Mom Holds Baby

'Positional bias' is common among humans and wild animals

(Newser) - It's long been observed that mothers tend to cradle their infants on their left side, and this has long been at least informally attributed to handedness (so that right-handed mothers have the right hand free). Now researchers report in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution that "positional bias"... More »

Filling a Cavity May Never Be the Same

Alzheimer's drug tideglusib gets them to fill themselves

(Newser) - A novel therapy holds real promise in changing the way dentists treat your cavities—they'd get the cavities to fill themselves. As the Guardian reports, researchers at King's College London found that they could stimulate stem cells within the teeth to regenerate through a relatively simple approach: They... More »

Our Moon May Have Been Created From 'Moonlets'

A series of cosmic collisions may have spawned the smaller moonlets

(Newser) - A series of cosmic collisions may have spawned multiple moonlets that morphed into the one big moon we know today, the AP reports. Rather than one giant impact that knocked off part of early Earth and created the moon, a number of smaller collisions may have produced lots of mini-moons,... More »

A Blood Test Predicts How Well You're Going to Age

What secrets lurk within?

(Newser) - Every time the oldest people in the world celebrate a birthday, they're inevitably asked their secret to aging. Some cite alcohol, others the lack of it; some how much they sleep, others how little; many talk about just relaxing , and almost all pay homage to having good genes. Now... More »

Lost City Found: 5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week

Man says he followed hunch, found lost city

(Newser) - A lost city and a new organ make this week's list of interesting discoveries:
  • Dinosaur Eggs Hatched in Potentially Troublesome Way : A Florida State University professor thinks he's solved one of the "greatest riddles" about non-avian dinosaurs: Did their eggs incubate slowly like those of lizards, or
... More »

Mystery Cosmic Waves Traced to Distant Galaxy

Source is a 'faint and puny galaxy'

(Newser) - Astronomers searching for the origins of a mysterious blast of radio waves have solved the puzzle: a tiny galaxy billions of light years from Earth, Space reports. So-called FRBs (fast radio bursts) twinkle in the sky for only a millisecond, yet they radiate more energy than the sun ever could... More »

Live Near Heavy Traffic? You Have Higher Dementia Risk

Study finds that those who live near major roads are more likely to develop dementia

(Newser) - Those who live near a high-traffic area may be at a higher risk of developing dementia, a new study out of Canada finds. Researchers looked at the records of more than 6.5 million Ontario residents ages 20 to 85 between 2001 and 2012, and found that within that group... More »

Fossil Fills in Big Blank About the Mysterious 'Ghost Shark'

It belongs to an early chimaera, not a shark

(Newser) - The chimaera, or so-called "ghost shark," is an elusive deep-water fish that has fascinated biologists for more than a century. Like its relative the shark, however, it's made of cartilage and thus rarely fossilizes, so little is known about its evolutionary past, reports Live Science . Now the... More »

Man Follows Hunch, Says He Has Uncovered Lost City

13th-century Trellech was once Wales' largest city

(Newser) - Stuart Wilson says people thought he was crazy when he gambled $39,000—his life savings—on a 4.6-acre field in Wales. Having heard a farmer's story about moles digging up bits of pottery on the land, the amateur archaeologist tells the Guardian he had a hunch that... More »

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