medical research

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Daily Diet Soda May Take Toll on Your Brain

Study suggests an increased risk of stroke and dementia

(Newser) - Diet soda might help with the waistline, but a new study suggests it's bad for the brain. Researchers in Massachusetts found that those who drank at least one artificially sweetened beverage per day were about three times as likely to experience a stroke or dementia compared to those who... More »

Blood in Umbilical Cord May Improve Our Memories

Older mice injected with it performed better on maze tests

(Newser) - Oh, the proverbial fountain of youth. As we age, can we somehow tap into it? Researchers are exploring this in a literal way as they study the effects of blood from human umbilical cords—which is about as young as it gets—on aging mice. Reporting in the journal Nature... More »

This Toddler Is Fighting 'Childhood Alzheimer's'

Marian, who is 18 months old, suffers from fatal Niemann Pick Type C disorder

(Newser) - One family has just gotten the kind of news every parent dreads, reports the Stir : Their 18-month-old daughter has an extremely rare, incurable, and fatal genetic disorder called Niemann Pick Type C, which is often referred to as childhood Alzheimer's. But there's a new drug currently in clinical... More »

What Our Gums Say About Our Overall Health

Having all our teeth is a very good sign

(Newser) - Don't think your oral health is as important as the health of the rest of your body? Think again. Researchers have turned to 57,000 women over age 55 in the Women's Health Initiative program to conduct the largest study of its kind on the relationship between oral... More »

Scientists Recreate Female Reproductive System in Lab

They hope to study endometriosis, fibroids, cancer, and more

(Newser) - Scientists have created a device that mimics the female reproductive cycle, hailing it as a breakthrough in the study of diseases that affect hundreds of millions of women and girls around the world. Reporting in the journal Nature Communications , researchers at Northwestern University and beyond note that their "microfluidic... More »

Science's Surprising Discovery: Lungs Aren't Just for Breathing

They're a key part of blood formation, too: study

(Newser) - All this time we thought lungs were just for breathing. It turns out they also play a key role in how blood is formed, suggests a study in Nature out of the University of California-San Francisco. Scientists studying the lungs of mice discovered to their surprise that the lungs produced... More »

How the Brains of Those Blinded at a Young Age Differ

Some areas show increased connectivity

(Newser) - Ever wonder whether being blind was in some way an advantage for pianists like Ray Charles, George Shearing, Art Tatum, and Stevie Wonder? New research published in the journal PLOS ONE finds that the brains of people blind from a young age are dramatically different than the brains of normally... More »

Whole-Body Vibration Could Affect Body Like Exercise

The jury is still out on whether it works in humans

(Newser) - Remember last year's exciting finding that just a few minutes of high-intensity interval training can reap similar health benefits as 45 minutes of moderate exercise? Well, there's a chance that just sitting on a vibrating platform might also reap similar benefits, especially for those with type 2 diabetes—... More »

The Dead Man Had CTE, but Not the History You'd Expect

No history or brain injury, contact sports

(Newser) - Think CTE only affects people who've suffered brain injuries? So did scientists—until one man turned their research upside down. For the first time, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disorder previously found only in people who suffered head injuries, has been found in a patient with no such history,... More »

Men Who Smoke Affect Future Kids in Surprising Way

Life-saving drugs may be less effective for them, study suggests

(Newser) - When research began to trickle out 10 years ago suggesting that what we do today can affect the health of our unborn children, it was largely "considered heretical," medical biochemistry professor Dr. Oliver Rando tells the Boston Herald . Not anymore. Habits like cigarette smoking have since been shown... More »

Don't Marry Mario: 'Locked-in' Patients Can Finally 'Talk'

They communicate by thinking yes or no

(Newser) - Four paralyzed patients unable to communicate for years were finally able to do so through a potentially groundbreaking brain-reading system. And it turns out that one of them really didn't want his daughter to marry her boyfriend. The patients all had advanced ALS and were unable to control even... More »

Man's Daily Vodka Intake Calcified His Pancreas

He'd consumed the equivalent of 5 shots daily for 15 years

(Newser) - After drinking a half a pint of vodka every day since he was 35, a 50-year-old man in Pennsylvania went to the emergency room vomiting blood. He complained of abdominal pain and "foul-smelling diarrhea" that had been plaguing him for two months, per a report on his case in... More »

Startup Bets 'Young Blood,' Taken Literally, Fights Aging

Clinical trial underway, but you have to pay to play

(Newser) - If you'd like to fill your veins with the blood of young people, you need only drain your bank account of $8,000. That's right, young blood is now joining the ever-growing ranks of "cures" people are paying for to combat age-related diseases and even aging itself.... More »

A Discovery About Memory Could Help the Mentally Ill

Scientists have a new view on 'working memory'

(Newser) - Scientists have a new theory about how the brain processes memories, one that holds the promise—someday—of helping those with depression and other mental illnesses. The study out of the University of Wisconsin focused on working memory, which covers immediate stuff like new phone numbers or where we left... More »

Dose of Magic Mushrooms Had Big Effect on Cancer Patients

A single dose of psilocybin in a controlled setting appears to reap long-term benefits

(Newser) - Hallucinogens are back on the table—at least when it comes to clinical trials. Hundreds of trials in the 1940s and 1950s studied their effects, but since their ban in the late '60s the research all but stopped, reports the New York Times . Nowadays, though, drugs like MDMA (think... More »

100-Year-Old Antiseptic Could Battle Viruses and Superbugs

It does double duty, binding to DNA of both patients and bacteria

(Newser) - An antiseptic that German scientists invented in 1912 using coal tar has the potential to help treat and prevent both viral and bacterial infections, according to new research out of the Hudson Institute of Medical Research in Australia. Acriflavine was used throughout both world wars as a shotgun approach to... More »

Doctor Now Studying Rare Disease That Nearly Killed Him

David Fajgenbaum's last rites were read to him in 2010

(Newser) - When David Fajgenbaum's mother died of brain cancer, the Georgetown University student founded Students of Ailing Mothers and Fathers in 2007 to cope. Now a doctor who's been diagnosed with a rare and deadly disease, he's founded another organization, the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network , where he works... More »

Here's Why You Should Use Heartburn Meds With Caution

Proton pump inhibitors appear to increase the risk of ischemic stroke

(Newser) - Heartburn is a big problem in the US. In fact, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are used to treat acid reflux and heartburn, are among the most prescribed drugs in the country, with millions taking them, and they're becoming more widely available over-the-counter, reports CNN . But a preliminary report... More »

Yo-Yo Dieting Is Bad for Women's Hearts

'Weight cycling' appears to be a significant risk factor for otherwise healthy women

(Newser) - Lots of people are trying to lose weight—24% of American men and 38% of American women—but most who succeed also gain it back quickly, reports Medical News Daily . This so-called "weight cycling" or "yo-yo effect" could end up being quite hard on the hearts of both... More »

When Teens Binge Drink, It Could Impact Their Future Kids

Repeated binge drinking appears to affect certain brain functions in offspring, at least in rats

(Newser) - Alcohol and adolescence don't mix—especially not when the alcohol is in regularly large quantities. So said Loyola University researchers at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience this week, where they presented their findings, Science Daily reports. They've been studying the effects of binge drinking on... More »

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