archaeology

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Archaeologists Race to Map History Before ISIS Destroys It

Volunteers will risk lives to get 3-D images of world's oldest and most important sites

(Newser) - Archaeologists and thousands of volunteers are in a race against time to digitally map some of the world's oldest and most important statues, temples, and cities before they can be destroyed by the Islamic State, the Los Angeles Times reports. If ISIS "is permitted to wipe the slate... More »

Scientists Study Lost Site of Largest Native American Massacre

Cavalrymen killed at least 250 Shoshone men, women, children in Idaho in 1863

(Newser) - By the end of that frigid day in January 1863, the blood of at least 250 men, women, and children stained the ground in Idaho. But rather than occupying a dark place in American history, the victims of the nation's single largest Native American massacre—Shoshone Indians slaughtered in... More »

ISIS Beheads Archaeology Pioneer

Khaled al-Asaad beheaded in Palmyra, where he worked for 50 years

(Newser) - A tragic blow to the archaeology community: Islamic State militants have beheaded one of Syria's most prominent antiquities scholars in a square in the seized city of Palmyra, where dozens of people gathered to watch, Syrian state media and a British activist group report, via the AP . The body... More »

The Lost City of Atlantis May Be Hiding in Plain Sight

Sergio Frau suspects Plato was writing about a tidal wave on Sardinia

(Newser) - Some say the lost city of Atlantis lies not at the bottom of the ocean but in plain sight off the coast of Italy on the island of Sardinia. Herodotus and Aristotle were two who thought Plato's description of a land beyond the strait between Sicily and Tunisia, which... More »

Pa. Construction Worker Stumbles Onto Mass Grave

Bones probably date to 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic

(Newser) - A construction worker may have unearthed a mass grave while digging last week on private property in Schuylkill Haven, Pa. Local historians say the bones could very well belong to those who died during the 1918 Spanish influenza pandemic, which wiped out 1,600 people in a month in this... More »

French Baron's Long-Lost Ship Possibly Found —Off Israel

Baron de Rothschild shipped materials to his glass factory in Tantura from France

(Newser) - A mysterious, century-old shipwreck found 40 years ago off Israel's coast has been tentatively revealed to be a priceless find: the long-lost ship of a French baron, say Haifa University archaeologists. Baron Edmond James de Rothschild—who moved raw materials from France to a glass factory he constructed in... More »

Has Queen Nefertiti's Lost Tomb Been Found?

'This is potentially the biggest archaeological discovery ever made'

(Newser) - Tutankhamun's tomb was discovered in 1922. Now, nearly a century later, a University of Arizona archaeologist says that tomb may hold a long-buried secret: the remains of Nefertiti . Nicholas Reeves says he stumbled upon the possibility while analyzing scans posted online in early 2014 by Spanish art-replication experts. The... More »

Hatfields, McCoys Pinpoint Key Feud Location

Descendants of feuding families find artifacts at site of 1888 attack

(Newser) - The Hatfield and McCoy descendants came armed—with digging tools. Side by side, they worked together to help archaeologists unearth artifacts from one of the bloodiest sites in America's most famous feud. The leader of the dig says they have pinpointed the place where Randolph McCoy's home was... More »

Archaeologists Find Rare Writing, Then It Disappears

Inscriptions on plaster in ritual bath have now been sealed

(Newser) - Archaeologists digging for ruins ahead of a new construction project in Jerusalem made an incredible discovery—that immediately began to vanish. During the last hours of a "salvage excavation" two months ago, the Israel Antiquities Authority stumbled upon a 2,000-year-old ritual bath when a stone suddenly disappeared into... More »

Roanoke Island Mystery May Finally Be Solved

Archaeologists dig up new items in North Carolina

(Newser) - The mystery of Roanoke Island may be one for the books. Two archaeological teams have dug up new evidence pointing to the fate of English colonists who mysteriously vanished from the North Carolina island 425 years ago, National Geographic reports. One collection of items appears to support the long-held theory... More »

Ancient Mystery Monolith Found Off Sicily's Coast

It dates back 10K years, was submerged in flood

(Newser) - Archaeologists have made quite the find off the coast of Sicily: a monolith that dates back about 10,000 years. It's broken in two now and on its side, but the block would have stood nearly 40 feet tall in its heyday, before a massive flood submerged it (along... More »

This Massive Site Might Just Put Stonehenge to Shame

Archaeologists excavating henge 10 times larger than its neighbor

(Newser) - You think Stonehenge is impressive? Archaeologists in Britain are excavating a monument ten times larger than the iconic structure, though it appears to the naked eye to be little more than farmland. A henge is a circular earthwork, and the one in question is Marden Henge, which sits a few... More »

Archaeologists Find the Gate to Goliath's Hometown

The city entrance is one of the largest ever found in Israel

(Newser) - An archaeological dig now in its 20th year has uncovered the entrance gate to Gath, the ancient Biblical city of the Philistines and onetime home of the giant Goliath. Before the king of Damascus destroyed it in 830 BCE, Gath was the largest city in the land for hundreds of... More »

Archaeologists Find Historic Synagogue Ruined by Nazis

Remnants found beneath a school in Lithuania

(Newser) - The Great Synagogue of Vilna dated all the way back to the 1600s and was what the Jerusalem Post calls one of "the most historic and treasured landmarks of European Jewry." But that synagogue, in the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, was all but destroyed by the Nazis during... More »

Inside the Mystery of Alexander the Great's Dad

New study claims his dad wasn't buried where researchers thought

(Newser) - The bad news: The ancient tomb at Vergina believed to house Alexander the Great's father may in fact be the final resting place of someone else. The good news: King Philip II's tomb is just a few doors down, according to a new study—though not everyone is... More »

Scroll So Charred It Looks Like Charcoal Finally Read

1.5K-year-old scroll sat unreadable since being found in 1970

(Newser) - When a 1,500-year-old scroll was found in the ashes of an ancient synagogue on the shores of the Dead Sea just south of Jerusalem in 1970, it was so charred it resembled a piece of charcoal and was impossible to read or preserve. But now, thanks to the latest... More »

4K-Year-Old Home Turns Up in Ohio

Hunter-gatherers apparently lived there during colder months

(Newser) - One tribe lived in Ohio so long ago we don't even have a name for them. Archaeologists recently uncovered one of their 4,000-year-old homes in Lorain County and say it belonged to hunter-gatherers who visited periodically during the fall and winter, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports. "There'... More »

Shipwreck Recalls Really Bad Luck for 2 Invasions

Japanese find harks back to 13th-century Mongol attacks

(Newser) - A shipwreck off the coast of Japan serves as evidence that no navy can defeat Mother Nature. Archaeologists spotted the wreck off the island of Takashima in southern Japan and say it belongs to one of two attempted Mongol invasions from the 13th century, Archaeology reports. Running 65 feet long... More »

Old Well May Delve Into US History

A magazine calls the find 'tantalizing'

(Newser) - Archaeologists in Jamestown—the first permanent English settlement in the Americas—say they may have found another well that delves deep into US colonial history, Popular Archaeology reports. Spotted in a seven-foot-deep cellar dating to the early 1600s, the partially visible find is "a pretty good-sized pit," says... More »

Secret Tunnel by 'Dracula's Dungeon' Uncovered

Blocked tunnel may lead to bath at Tokat's city center

(Newser) - Archaeologists still aren't entirely sure where a secret passageway beneath a castle in Turkey leads, but visitors can now explore it for themselves. Not far from where Vlad the Impaler—the inspiration for Dracula— was reportedly held in one of two dungeons inside Tokat Castle, the tunnel stretches for... More »

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