archaeology

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Israel's Burning Man Torched Ancient Relics

Site of festival fire housed ancient flint tools

(Newser) - The Israeli Antiquities Authority says revelers at a Burning Man festival famous for its pyrotechnic spectacles have accidentally torched some remnants of prehistoric man. Archaeologist Yoram Haimi says organizers of Midburn, an Israeli affiliate of the Nevada carnival, burned a wooden temple Saturday on a hilltop scattered with flint tools... More »

Archaeologists Learn How Cannibals Prepared Flesh

Some bones appear to have been boiled with axiote or chilli

(Newser) - With evidence of cannibalism persisting throughout many eras and across many lands, scientists recently set out to determine precisely how one known group of cannibals prepared human flesh. Reporting in the journal Archaeometry , they say the remains of 18 men, women, and children dating to between 700BC and 500BC, found... More »

Study: What May Have Doomed America's 'First City'

Massive floods may have led to demise of Cahokia, site of modern St. Louis

(Newser) - For Native Americans living in the 12th century, Cahokia was the place to be. Now researchers think they've uncovered a major reason why the hub located near what is now St. Louis disappeared—massive flooding of the Mississippi River. Researchers dug up soil samples from two local lakes and... More »

Bronze Age Priestess Found in 1921 Traveled Far

The teen, found in Denmark, likely came from southern Germany

(Newser) - The remains of a Bronze Age cultic priestess found in Egtved, Denmark, in 1921 belong to a teenager who'd likely traveled all the way from southern Germany—a great distance for the year 1370BC, researchers report in a press release . They now know this is because her oak coffin... More »

China's Terracotta Army Could Grow Larger

Excavation should reveal hundreds more soldiers in No. 2 pit

(Newser) - A new excavation of something branded the "No. 2 pit" is a potentially much more remarkable undertaking than it sounds: It could swell the ranks of China's famed terracotta army. Work began March 30 on the pit, which sits adjacent to the tomb mound of Qin Shi Huang,... More »

Archaeologists Resurrect Key Pocahontas Site

The church where she wed John Rolfe is coming back to life

(Newser) - A group of archaeologists in Jamestown, Virginia, is busy doing the opposite of what one would normally expect: building something new, rather than searching for what once was. Popular Archaeology reports that an effort is underway to rebuild a potion of the church where Pocahontas wed John Rolfe in 1614... More »

Teotihuacan Find Boosts Hope of Royal Tomb

Liquid mercury in pyramid could symbolize path to underworld

(Newser) - A 600-foot tunnel below a pyramid in the ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan has given up 50,000 artifacts —but its latest reveal could indicate something far more significant lies in wait. After six years of toiling below the Pyramid of the Plumed Serpent, archaeologist Sergio Gomez says he'... More »

Pharaoh's Ancient Chapel Found in Egypt

It was built by Nectanebo I, of the last native dynasty before Alexander the Great

(Newser) - Researchers have made an impressive find in Cairo: part of a chapel built by a pharaoh some 2,300 years ago, Phys.org reports. That pharaoh was King Nectanebo I, whose reign lasted from 379 to 360 BC, daijiworld.com reports. The chapel, part of a temple site in the... More »

Archaeologists May Have Found World's First Tools

Discovered in Kenya, they predate the arrival of modern humans

(Newser) - Archaeologists may have just rewritten the book on the first use of tools in a major way. The team found what it says are unmistakable stone tools at a site near Lake Turkana in Kenya that date back 3.3 million years, reports Science . That doesn't just eclipse the... More »

'Exotic Animal' Found Amid Centuries-Old Trash

A full camel skeleton is unearthed in Austria

(Newser) - The study on the Austrian find calls it a "sunken ship of the desert" and an "exotic animal." What exactly was found in a cellar containing centuries-old trash during excavations for a planned shopping center in Tulln: the full skeleton of a 17th-century camel. That a complete... More »

Big Medieval Cemetery Found Under Cambridge

It's one of the nation's largest

(Newser) - Historians have long known that a medieval cemetery existed on the grounds of what is now the University of Cambridge, but until a recent dig they didn't realize just how big it was. Archaeologists uncovered the full or partial remains of about 1,300 people beneath Old Divinity School... More »

Ancient Egyptian Brewery Uncovered—in Israel

Pottery shows Egyptians reached farther north than previously known

(Newser) - A construction site in Tel Aviv has given up evidence of a bit of 5,000-year-old revelry in the form of an early Bronze Age brewery in 17 pits dating from 3500BC to 3000BC, Haaretz reports. Though the pits would have stored agricultural produce, they were "all full of... More »

Relic in Ancient Basilica May Hold Apostle's Ashes

Archaeologists say small vessel in Bulgaria came from John's grave site

(Newser) - Archaeologists in Bulgaria think they've found ashes belonging to one of the 12 apostles. The team found a small lead container with ashes while excavating a basilica that dates back to the sixth century AD, reports Archaeology in Bulgaria . The markings on the inch-long vessel match those at the... More »

Found in Turkey: Huge Underground City

May be the biggest one ever found in region

(Newser) - It's a stunning find uncovered by accident: Construction workers demolishing homes in Turkey's Nevsehir province in 2013 ended up discovering entrances to what could be the largest ancient underground city ever found in the region. The country's Hurriyet Daily News reported on its existence just days before... More »

Cave's 'Red Lady' Was Real Queen of the Stone Age

Woman who died 19K years ago received most elaborate burial in millennia

(Newser) - Stone Age hunter-gatherers weren't big on social hierarchies, let alone monarchies, researchers say, but a woman buried in a cave 18,700 years ago was clearly held in very high regard. The woman dubbed the "Red Lady," whose remains were unearthed in a cave in northern Spain,... More »

Ancient Animal Fat Shows Humans Butchered Game

500K-year-old tools still had residue of it

(Newser) - Archaeologists in Israel say they've discovered something along the lines of an open-air butcher shop, and the tools there prove that these ancient butchers worked on big game. That proof? The axes and scrapers used there 500,000 years ago still had residue of animal fat on them—a... More »

Whale Fossil Provides Clues on Human Origins

Discovery sheds light on when uplift of African continent began

(Newser) - An ancient whale with a bad sense of direction is helping researchers figure out when the landscape of Africa changed in a way that drove the evolution of humans. The beaked whale in question apparently took a wrong turn into a river and swam into modern-day Kenya about 17 million... More »

Scientists: Cervantes' Lost Remains Are Found

But his bones may be impossible to identify

(Newser) - The lost remains of Don Quixote author Miguel de Cervantes may have finally been found nearly 400 years after the writer's death—and a year after experts began searching for them. Experts working at Madrid's Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians used ground-penetrating radar among other technology to identify... More »

Ring Links Vikings to Ancient Islam

Colored-glass ring is inscribed with either 'to Allah' or 'for Allah'

(Newser) - Those Vikings really got around: Not only did they land in North America long before 1492, they may have visited the Islamic world as well. As possible evidence, researchers say a ring from a ninth-century Viking woman's grave looks exceptionally Islamic, Science News reports. The silver ring was first... More »

Archaeologists Uncover 'Mask Unlike Any Other'

Larger-than-life bronze mask depicts ancient god of shepherds

(Newser) - An ancient god has resurfaced in Israel thanks to what archaeologists say is a one-of-a-kind discovery. University of Haifa researchers were digging at what's believed to be an ancient basalt armory outside Sussita—which the Jerusalem Post reports was once the Roman city of Antiochia Hippos—when a ball... More »

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