archaeology

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Inside the Mystery of Alexander the Great's Dad

New study claims his dad wasn't buried where researchers thought

(Newser) - The bad news: The ancient tomb at Vergina believed to house Alexander the Great's father may in fact be the final resting place of someone else. The good news: King Philip II's tomb is just a few doors down, according to a new study—though not everyone is... More »

Scroll So Charred It Looks Like Charcoal Finally Read

1.5K-year-old scroll sat unreadable since being found in 1970

(Newser) - When a 1,500-year-old scroll was found in the ashes of an ancient synagogue on the shores of the Dead Sea just south of Jerusalem in 1970, it was so charred it resembled a piece of charcoal and was impossible to read or preserve. But now, thanks to the latest... More »

4K-Year-Old Home Turns Up in Ohio

Hunter-gatherers apparently lived there during colder months

(Newser) - One tribe lived in Ohio so long ago we don't even have a name for them. Archaeologists recently uncovered one of their 4,000-year-old homes in Lorain County and say it belonged to hunter-gatherers who visited periodically during the fall and winter, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports. "There'... More »

Shipwreck Recalls Really Bad Luck for 2 Invasions

Japanese find harks back to 13th-century Mongol attacks

(Newser) - A shipwreck off the coast of Japan serves as evidence that no navy can defeat Mother Nature. Archaeologists spotted the wreck off the island of Takashima in southern Japan and say it belongs to one of two attempted Mongol invasions from the 13th century, Archaeology reports. Running 65 feet long... More »

Old Well May Delve Into US History

A magazine calls the find 'tantalizing'

(Newser) - Archaeologists in Jamestown—the first permanent English settlement in the Americas—say they may have found another well that delves deep into US colonial history, Popular Archaeology reports. Spotted in a seven-foot-deep cellar dating to the early 1600s, the partially visible find is "a pretty good-sized pit," says... More »

Secret Tunnel by 'Dracula's Dungeon' Uncovered

Blocked tunnel may lead to bath at Tokat's city center

(Newser) - Archaeologists still aren't entirely sure where a secret passageway beneath a castle in Turkey leads, but visitors can now explore it for themselves. Not far from where Vlad the Impaler—the inspiration for Dracula— was reportedly held in one of two dungeons inside Tokat Castle, the tunnel stretches for... More »

Scientists Reconstructing Ancient Jar Find a Mystery

The inscription dates back to the King David era

(Newser) - When archaeologists stumbled upon hundreds of shards of pottery at the Khirbet Qeiyafa biblical site near Jerusalem in 2012, they noticed letters in ancient Canaanite on some of the pieces and began the work of putting the 3,000-year-old jar back together. What they found was the inscription of a... More »

Archaeologists Find Grave of 'Sleeping Beauty'

During a 6-week excavation of the ancient city of Aksum in Ethiopia

(Newser) - During a six-week excavation in northern Ethiopia, English archaeologists uncovered 11 graves that contained "extraordinary" items. But the inhabitant of one of the graves is herself particularly enthralling: a so-called "Sleeping Beauty," as Louise Schofield, who led the team, has dubbed her. The woman's positioning and... More »

Archaeologists: Shipwreck Isn't Long-Sought Griffin

Pair of divers thought they solved Great Lakes mystery

(Newser) - The Griffin remains lost: Michigan state archaeologists say a shipwreck found in Lake Michigan isn't that of the earliest known wreck in the Great Lakes. The Muskegon Chronicle reports two men came forward late last year with photos of the shipwreck found off of Frankfort, which is about 40... More »

Archaeologists Save Sphinx Buried in ... California

Relics from Cecil B. DeMille's 'Ten Commandments' set restored

(Newser) - After months of painstaking work in the sands of California, archaeologists have managed to restore a sphinx and other relics from a lost age—1920s Hollywood. The sphinx, one of 21 used in Cecil B. DeMille's 1923 movie The Ten Commandments, has been restored after it was excavated from... More »

Israel's Burning Man Torched Ancient Relics

Site of festival fire housed ancient flint tools

(Newser) - The Israeli Antiquities Authority says revelers at a Burning Man festival famous for its pyrotechnic spectacles have accidentally torched some remnants of prehistoric man. Archaeologist Yoram Haimi says organizers of Midburn, an Israeli affiliate of the Nevada carnival, burned a wooden temple Saturday on a hilltop scattered with flint tools... More »

Archaeologists Learn How Cannibals Prepared Flesh

Some bones appear to have been boiled with axiote or chilli

(Newser) - With evidence of cannibalism persisting throughout many eras and across many lands, scientists recently set out to determine precisely how one known group of cannibals prepared human flesh. Reporting in the journal Archaeometry , they say the remains of 18 men, women, and children dating to between 700BC and 500BC, found... More »

Study: What May Have Doomed America's 'First City'

Massive floods may have led to demise of Cahokia, site of modern St. Louis

(Newser) - For Native Americans living in the 12th century, Cahokia was the place to be. Now researchers think they've uncovered a major reason why the hub located near what is now St. Louis disappeared—massive flooding of the Mississippi River. Researchers dug up soil samples from two local lakes and... More »

Bronze Age Priestess Found in 1921 Traveled Far

The teen, found in Denmark, likely came from southern Germany

(Newser) - The remains of a Bronze Age cultic priestess found in Egtved, Denmark, in 1921 belong to a teenager who'd likely traveled all the way from southern Germany—a great distance for the year 1370BC, researchers report in a press release . They now know this is because her oak coffin... More »

China's Terracotta Army Could Grow Larger

Excavation should reveal hundreds more soldiers in No. 2 pit

(Newser) - A new excavation of something branded the "No. 2 pit" is a potentially much more remarkable undertaking than it sounds: It could swell the ranks of China's famed terracotta army. Work began March 30 on the pit, which sits adjacent to the tomb mound of Qin Shi Huang,... More »

Archaeologists Resurrect Key Pocahontas Site

The church where she wed John Rolfe is coming back to life

(Newser) - A group of archaeologists in Jamestown, Virginia, is busy doing the opposite of what one would normally expect: building something new, rather than searching for what once was. Popular Archaeology reports that an effort is underway to rebuild a potion of the church where Pocahontas wed John Rolfe in 1614... More »

Teotihuacan Find Boosts Hope of Royal Tomb

Liquid mercury in pyramid could symbolize path to underworld

(Newser) - A 600-foot tunnel below a pyramid in the ancient Mexican city of Teotihuacan has given up 50,000 artifacts —but its latest reveal could indicate something far more significant lies in wait. After six years of toiling below the Pyramid of the Plumed Serpent, archaeologist Sergio Gomez says he'... More »

Pharaoh's Ancient Chapel Found in Egypt

It was built by Nectanebo I, of the last native dynasty before Alexander the Great

(Newser) - Researchers have made an impressive find in Cairo: part of a chapel built by a pharaoh some 2,300 years ago, Phys.org reports. That pharaoh was King Nectanebo I, whose reign lasted from 379 to 360 BC, daijiworld.com reports. The chapel, part of a temple site in the... More »

Archaeologists May Have Found World's First Tools

Discovered in Kenya, they predate the arrival of modern humans

(Newser) - Archaeologists may have just rewritten the book on the first use of tools in a major way. The team found what it says are unmistakable stone tools at a site near Lake Turkana in Kenya that date back 3.3 million years, reports Science . That doesn't just eclipse the... More »

'Exotic Animal' Found Amid Centuries-Old Trash

A full camel skeleton is unearthed in Austria

(Newser) - The study on the Austrian find calls it a "sunken ship of the desert" and an "exotic animal." What exactly was found in a cellar containing centuries-old trash during excavations for a planned shopping center in Tulln: the full skeleton of a 17th-century camel. That a complete... More »

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