Stories 1 - 20 |  Next >>

Archaeologists on Hunt to Unearth Long-Buried Movie Set

Flights over desert helping in 'Ten Commandments' search

(Newser) - Thou shalt restore the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes to their natural state once filming wraps up. That’s the commandment given to movie director Cecil B. DeMille, who filmed his epic The Ten Commandments in the sand dunes on the Central California coast in the early 1920s, KCBX reports. Apparently, though, he... More »

New Discoveries Shine Light on Stonehenge

'The stone monument is iconic, but it’s only a little part of the whole thing'

(Newser) - The New York Times has an interesting roundup of recent discoveries made at and around Stonehenge that could shed new light on the famous monument and the people who built it nearly 5,000 years ago. Last month, archaeologists dug up an ancient house at an area called Blick Mead... More »

New Discovery Solves Centuries-Old Jewish Riddle

What archaeologists found under a parking lot is 'a dream come true'

(Newser) - More than 100 years of searching and 10 years of digging culminated in a find Jewish archaeologists are calling "a dream come true," LiveScience reports. The Greek ruler Antiochus IV Epiphanes—the "villain" of Hanukkah—built the Acra 2,000 years ago to exert control over Jerusalem,... More »

Possible Major Secret Found Inside King Tut's Tomb

Is this the final resting place of Nefertiti?

(Newser) - A team of archaeologists has taken a big step toward confirming a tantalizing theory about King Tut's tomb—one that might reveal the long-sought burial place of Queen Nefertiti. National Geographic reports that infrared scans of the tomb suggest the existence of a hidden chamber. " The preliminary analysis... More »

NASA Gives Best Look at Mysterious Geoglyphs

Some are absolutely massive and thousands of years old

(Newser) - Archaeology enthusiast Dmitriy Dey was watching a television program on pyramids when he decided such things should exist in his native Kazakhstan, as well. The New York Times reports he hopped onto Google Earth to look around a little and stumbled across what could prove to be the oldest earthworks... More »

Expedition Finds 'Ancient Shipwreck Capital of the World'

Archaeologists find 22 shipwrecks in less than two weeks

(Newser) - Teams from Greece and the US have made one of the biggest archaeological finds of the year, Discovery reports. While exploring Greece's Fourni archipelago, the Greek Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and RPM Nautical Foundation stumbled across what Smithsonian describes as an "artifact jackpot" and what Discovery says could... More »

Archaeologists Discover Tomb Stuffed With Riches

Inside: a 'griffin warrior'

(Newser) - Archaeologists have discovered a treasure trove in the undisturbed grave of a warrior who died some 3,500 years ago in Greece. Found in the ancient city of Pylos in May, the 5-foot-deep grave contained a bronze sword with an ivory hilt; a gold-hilted dagger; four gold rings; a gold... More »

Aztec Site Reveals Grisly Fate of Captured Spaniards

Horses and people were eaten, but not pigs

(Newser) - Excavations at the site of one of the Spanish conquistadors' worst defeats in Mexico are yielding new evidence about what happened when the two cultures clashed—and the native Mexicans were in control. Faced with strange invaders accompanied by unknown animal species, the inhabitants of an Aztec-allied town east of... More »

Farmer Finds Rare Prehistoric Mammoth

'It was certainly a lot bigger than a cow bone,' says Michigan man

(Newser) - A Michigan farmer had to take a short break from installing a drainage pipe in his wheat fields Monday when his backhoe hit the pelvis of a prehistoric mammoth, ABC News reports. "We didn't know what it was, but we knew it was certainly a lot bigger than... More »

Surprise Find: Pompeii Residents Had 'Perfect Teeth'

Also, study suggests many died from head injuries, not suffocation

(Newser) - High-tech scans of Pompeii residents killed in the long-ago eruption of Mount Vesuvius have provided two revelations: They had amazing teeth, and many were killed by falling masonry and other objects—as opposed to the widely held theory that they were suffocated by ash. As for the first: Thank a... More »

Scientists Uncover Missing Piece to Ancient Poem

Offers new details of Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh

(Newser) - When a man arrived at Iraq's Sulaymaniyah Museum offering to sell 80 to 90 clay tablets in 2011, it was Farouk Al-Rawi's job to study them. The professor at SOAS, University of London, found a few fakes in the mix, but spent much of his time examining a... More »

At Revolutionary War Site, 'Heroism Cries Out'

Archaeologists find exact spots soldiers stood during Parker's Revenge

(Newser) - Archaeologists using 21st-century technology are mapping out the exact spots British soldiers and Colonial militiamen were standing as they fired at each other during a pivotal skirmish on the first day of the American Revolution. Parker's Revenge, as the fight is known, occurred on April 19, 1775, after the... More »

Decapitated Head Kindles 9K-Year-Old Mystery

This was "ritualized decapitation," researchers say

(Newser) - A decapitated skull discovered in Brazil is providing clues to the long-lost beliefs of people who lived there thousands of years ago, the Smithsonian reports. Found in 2007 and revealed in a new study , the 9,000-year-old skull seems to have been cut off and buried under limestone slabs—which... More »

Famous Wreck Isn't Done Revealing Its Secrets

Antikythera in Greece yields more treasures, and researchers think more await

(Newser) - A shipwreck that gave the world the deeply mysterious Antikythera mechanism is still yielding treasures—and teaching researchers about the lifestyles of the Greek and ancient. The latest finds at the ancient wreck dubbed the "Titanic of the ancient world" include a bone flute, a bronze armrest that may... More »

Workers at Westminster Make Medieval Find Under Pipes

Remains of at least 50 people in abbey thought to be from 11th, 12th centuries

(Newser) - Workers demolishing a section of Westminster Abbey to make room for a new tower stumbled upon something most unexpected (at least in that part of the abbey): the remains of at least 50 people, including the skeleton of a 3-year-old, that archaeologists believe date back to the 11th and 12th... More »

Israel Thinks It's Cracked Mystery of Maccabees' Tomb

Scholars and archaeologists have pointed to this site for 150 years

(Newser) - For 150 years, scholars and archaeologists have sought the final resting place of the Maccabees, a band of rebels who established a Jewish kingdom in the second century BC, in one of the great mysteries of Jewish history, reports the AP . Now the Israeli Antiquities Authority says that it may... More »

Archaeologist Heads to Egypt to Find Nefertiti's Tomb

Brit Nicholas Reeves thinks she was buried next to son Tutankhamun

(Newser) - British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves, who made news last month with his announcement that the long-lost tomb of Nefertiti is likely hidden behind secret doors in her son Tutankhamun's tomb, is headed to Egypt to put his theory to the test, reports PhysOrg . Nefertiti, the famously beautiful and powerful wife... More »

Graves of Utah Massacre Victims Found, 150 Years Later

Archaeologist believes he has found the true burial site

(Newser) - An archaeologist believes he has found the true resting place of the victims of the Mountain Meadows Massacre—more than 150 years after the killings. Everett Bassett revealed his findings to families of the victims on Sept. 12 in Arkansas, according to the Salt Lake Tribune . "There's no... More »

Scientists Find Clues to Sailors' Legendary 1813 Survival

26 used supplies from wrecked ship Neva to survive a frosty month in Alaska

(Newser) - To shipwreck in Alaska in the early 19th century was as good as a death sentence—yet 26 aboard the Russian-American Company frigate Neva managed to not only survive its wreck off Kruzof Island but also a month of the winter of 1813. The feat spawned legends stretching over two... More »

3 Mysteries Archaeologists Are Poised to Crack

Perhaps the site of Alexander the Great's tomb?

(Newser) - Modern archaeologists are armed with much more than picks and shovels, and tools such as ground-penetrating radar and super-powerful computers leave them on the brink of some remarkable discoveries, writes Fredrik Hiebert. The archaeologist lays out some of them in National Geographic :
  • Famous tombs: Expect to see the resting places
... More »

Stories 1 - 20 |  Next >>