medical treatment

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Schizophrenia Treatment Sees a Simple Breakthrough

Early intervention has caught on in Australia and the UK

(Newser) - When Glenn, a smart high school student with a knack for building robots, began experiencing episodes of psychosis, he was diagnosed with schizophrenia and given a grim prognosis. He was prescribed medications and saw therapists, "But the common message from virtually everybody who worked with Glenn was that his... More »

Drug's Price Changed From $13.50 a Tablet to $750

Daraprim move doesn't go over well

(Newser) - "This isn't the greedy drug company trying to gouge patients, it is us trying to stay in business. It really doesn't make sense to get any criticism for this." The "this" Martin Shkreli is referring to is the price hike his company instituted after it... More »

Hospitals Giving 'Death Test' to Seniors

Analysis could help families, doctors deal with terminal illness

(Newser) - Seniors had better brace themselves: Some US hospitals are now administering the "death test," which estimates an elderly patient's chance of dying over the next 30 days. Invented in Australia, the test weighs 29 different criteria —including blood pressure, respiratory rate, and medical history—to determine... More »

Court Rules Teen Must Undergo Chemo

Connecticut 17-year-old thinks it will do more harm than good

(Newser) - A 17-year-old girl in Connecticut lost a court battle today to stop her chemotherapy treatments. The state Supreme Court ruled that child-welfare authorities were within their rights to take temporary custody of the teen because she and her mom think the chemo will do more harm than good, reports the... More »

Girl Fights Connecticut Over Right to Refuse Chemo

Cassandra's chance of survival put at 80%-85% with treatment

(Newser) - After 17-year-old Cassandra was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in September, she underwent two chemotherapy treatments in November at Connecticut Children's Medical Center before running away from home because she didn't want to complete the prescribed chemo. Now Cassandra is in the middle of a legal battle headed... More »

How an American Patient Changed Ebola Treatment

Despite ordeal, Dr. Ian Crozier plans to return to West Africa

(Newser) - Doctors feared an American colleague flown to Atlanta for Ebola treatment would die—and he nearly did. But Ian Crozier, a Rhodesia-born doctor who treated patients in Sierra Leone, has lived to tell his tale to the New York Times , which reports that his treatment in Atlanta has helped change... More »

Why Everyone Should Get Random Flu Shots

May hit disease at weak point, increase chance of random extinction event

(Newser) - If you missed getting your flu shot, it's not the end of the world. In fact, random treatment times may actually help manage a disease outbreak in the long run. New research suggests that when treatments are given twice a year, six months apart, a disease has time to... More »

Cat-Allergy Breakthrough Could Herald New Treatments

Cure may be available within a few years: report

(Newser) - Scientists have formulated a clearer picture of how cats cause allergic reactions, and it's bringing new hope for sufferers—indeed, as the Daily Mail puts it, a cure could be ready within five years. Cat allergies are generally caused by the animals' dander, or skin particles; researchers examined the... More »

Delhi Gang-Rape Victim May Need Organ Transplant

23-year-old now in Singapore for treatment

(Newser) - The woman who was gang-raped on a New Delhi bus has been flown to Singapore for treatment. The 23-year-old remains in 'extremely critical condition,' says a hospital rep, and she may need an organ transplant. India's government fears that continuing protests —which have already seen the... More »

Researchers Inch Toward Baldness Cure

Research centers on vitamin D, but remedies are years away

(Newser) - Treatments like Rogaine work best for those trying to stop further hair loss—but what about people who are already bald? Researchers worldwide are inching closer to treatments that could restore hair growth, the Wall Street Journal reports. The market is huge, with 35 million men suffering from male-pattern baldness... More »

For-Profit Hospital Chain Found Shady Procedures

HCA hospitals uncovered iffy cardiac work in Florida

(Newser) - Doctors performed needless and dangerous cardiac treatments for years at America's biggest for-profit hospital chain in an apparent attempt to bring in more money, the New York Times reports. Prodded by a nurse in 2010, hospital giant HCA uncovered cardiologists who couldn't justify their procedures at Florida hospitals... More »

Americans Make Life Easier With At-Home Dialysis

Kidney disease patients can avoid trips to medical centers

(Newser) - Dialysis treatment need not involve unpleasant trips to a medical center three or so times a week. Some Americans with kidney disease are now doing it themselves by hooking up to dialysis at home, the New York Times' The New Old Age blog reports. Barbara Boyle of Hayward, Calif., decided... More »

Doctors: Chill With All the MRIs, EKGs

With so much unnecessary testing, doctors try to rein in excess

(Newser) - US doctors need to scale back on 45 of the most common testing procedures and treatments—such as EKGs for physicals when there's no sign of heart trouble, MRIs for routine back pain, and antibiotics for mild sinusitis. A panel of nine medical specialty boards is to make the... More »

Yemen's Saleh En Route to US: Report

Hands over power, will seek medical treatment in Washington

(Newser) - Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh said Sunday he will travel to Washington for medical treatment and he asked Yemenis for forgiveness, saying it is time to hand over power in a farewell speech, state media reported. The mercurial president told Yemeni TV networks that he had formally handed power to... More »

US to Big Pharma: Disclose What You Pay Docs

New rules aim to increase transparency

(Newser) - Studies have found that when doctors accept payments from drug companies, it can influence their treatment decisions—so the Obama administration will soon require drug companies to disclose those payments. The New York Times reports that around 25% of doctors receive cash from drug companies for consulting, speaking engagements, and... More »

Your New Drug: Placebos

They seem to work even when patients know what they're getting

(Newser) - Placebos aren't just for research: Studies increasingly show that treatments with no active ingredients can work as well as—or even better than—"real" therapies. In one such study, some hotel employees were told they were getting good exercise at work; they lost weight, while fellow workers who... More »

Yemeni Prez Will Receive Medical Care in US: Officials

Aid for despised dictator will likely spark criticism

(Newser) - The debate is apparently over : Washington will allow Yemen's embattled president to visit New York for medical treatment, US officials tell the New York Times . They say the move will effectively disempower Ali Abdullah Saleh by removing him from Yemen, where demonstrators are still waging a deadly battle for... More »

Maggots Clean Wounds Faster Than Doctors

But they don't make wounds heal any better: experts

(Newser) - Maggots may work faster than any surgeon when it comes to cleaning large wounds that are slow to heal. Typically, doctors use scalpels and special enzymes to lift dead tissue from such wounds; researchers in France wanted to see if maggots could speed the process. They compared the two therapies... More »

Saudi King Heads to US for Medical Treatment

Abdullah said to be 'in stable condition'

(Newser) - Saudi Arabia's 86-year-old King Abdullah left home for the United States today to receive treatment for a blood clot and slipped disc. Saudi authorities have been unusually open in going public with the king's condition, apparently in an effort to prevent any speculation and reassure allies. Personal issues within the... More »

Oregon Tests New Approach to Health Insurance

Proven treatments are almost free, while others cost a bundle

(Newser) - A new type of insurance being tried out in Oregon has a great upside: free treatment for common maladies like diabetes or depression that have proven treatments. But if you wade into muddier or more elective treatments that critics say are overused, like knee replacement or bypass surgery, it’ll... More »

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