American Cancer Society

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Ominous Stats on the Women's Cancer Horizon

A 60% rise in deaths by 2030, per an ACS report

(Newser) - Two disturbing reports were issued this week on the cancer front, with one noting women will see a spike in cancer deaths over the next decade or so—5.5 million cancer deaths by the year 2030. The other report adds that women afflicted with breast cancer alone could nearly... More »

Ladies, Here Are Your New Mammogram Guidelines

But not everyone is on board with ACS' recommendations

(Newser) - For years, guidelines regarding mammograms have been, well, all over the place. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends women get a mammogram every two years starting at age 50. Since 2003, the American Cancer Society has recommended annual mammograms starting at age 40. The society's first mammogram guideline... More »

Top Cancer Killer of Women in Rich Nations Shifts

Smoking drives the change

(Newser) - For the first time, lung cancer has passed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths for women in rich countries. The reason is smoking, which peaked years later for women than it did for men. "We're seeing the deaths now" from lung cancer due to a... More »

Screenings Slash Colon Cancer Rate 30% in a Decade

But researchers see more work ahead

(Newser) - The fight against colon cancer through screening is "one of the great public health success stories of the decade," says a top figure at the American Cancer Society: In people over 50, colon cancer rates have dropped by 30% over the past decade, researchers say. That's mostly... More »

Experts: CVS Move Could Dent Smoking Rates

Inconvenience helps deter smokers, studies have shown

(Newser) - With hundreds of thousands of retailers in the US selling cigarettes, will CVS' landmark decision to end tobacco sales have any effect on smoking rates? Experts say it could have a major impact, both by putting more pressure on the tobacco industry and making it a little harder for people... More »

Daily Walk May Lower Breast Cancer Risk

American Cancer Society sees benefit for women

(Newser) - Women who walk at least one hour a day can lower their risk of breast cancer, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society. Over 17 years, researchers monitored the physical activity of more than 70,000 postmenopausal women. Those who walked at least seven hours a week—... More »

Big Tobacco, Anti-Smoking Groups Target ObamaCare

They don't want smokers charged more for insurance

(Newser) - Big Tobacco and anti-cancer activists are lining up against a provision in ObamaCare that would let insurers charge smokers more, the Washington Post reports. It's no small spike, either: One study found that a low-income smoker could see premiums leap from $708 to $3,308. "Our concern is... More »

Dental X-Rays Up Brain Tumor Risk

Study focused on 1960s, when more radiation used in X-rays than today

(Newser) - Dental X-rays have been linked to meningioma, the most common type of brain tumor, according to a new study by the American Cancer Society. The biggest correlation was found with bitewing X-rays, in which a patient bites on the film while an image is taken; according to the study, people... More »

6M Dead From Tobacco Last Year

It's also the No. 1 cause of death in China: Cancer Society

(Newser) - Tobacco killed 6 million people worldwide last year and now ranks as the No. 1 cause of death in China, according to a report from the American Cancer Society and World Lung Federation. What's more, the groups say tobacco use may be responsible for 1 billion deaths this century... More »

Some Cancers Climb as Deaths Drop Overall

No improvement in young adults' mortality rates

(Newser) - Cancer death rates are down overall, the American Cancer Society says, falling 1.8% among men and 1.6% among women between 2004 and 2008. Rates have dropped across all ethnic groups except American Indians and Alaskan natives, the Los Angeles Times notes. But the incidence of some types of... More »

College Degree Is Great Defense Against ... Cancer?

Why getting that degree could have unexpected health benefits

(Newser) - The gap in cancer death rates between college graduates and those who only went to high school is widening, the American Cancer Society reports. People with college degrees are seeing a significant drop in cancer death rates, while those who have spent less time in school are seeing more modest... More »

Soda Linked to Cancer: Study

2 soft drinks a week could raise pancreatic cancer risk by 87%

(Newser) - Soda drinkers could face a sharply higher risk of developing cancer than those who abstain from soft drinks. A study looking at 60,000 Chinese Singaporeans over 14 years found that those who drank more than two sodas a week were 87% more likely to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer... More »

Doctors Blast New Mammogram Guidelines

Cancer societies, gynecologists won't follow government's lead

(Newser) - There was an instant backlash from oncologists and gynecologists yesterday after a government panel recommended that that women in their 40s stop getting annual mammograms. “I think it is unfortunate that they came to this conclusion,” the director of imaging at one breast cancer center told the Los ... More »

Cancer Experts Worried About Screening

American Cancer Society to warn of risks as well as benefits

(Newser) - The American Cancer Society is rethinking its advice on screening for breast and prostate cancer amid studies showing that the tests can miss the deadliest forms of the disease, and in some cases lead to dangerous, unnecessary treatment. The society is working on a new message stressing that cancer screening... More »

Value of Prostate Screening in Doubt: Studies

Routine checks don't lower risk of cancer death, research shows

(Newser) - Routine screenings may do little or nothing to prevent deaths from prostate cancer, two new studies show. In US research on 76,000 men, the widely used PSA blood test didn't lower the risk of death. And a European trial that covered 162,000 subjects found only a modest reduction.... More »

Cancer Cases, Deaths Drop

Trend, ongoing since beginning of decade, linked to less smoking

(Newser) - Cancer researchers reported a good-news milestone today: Both the number of new cases and the number of cancer deaths are declining for the first time, USA Today reports. Scientists gave most of the credit to a drop in the number of smokers. “By preventing smoking, you can give someone... More »

Fewer Than 20% of US Adults Smoke, a First

Rate drops, though 43M still light up; 443K die yearly as result

(Newser) - Smoking in the US is at its lowest since cigarettes became widespread after World War I, Reuters reports, with fewer than 20% of adults in the country lighting up—the lowest figure on record. Observers credit the gradual decline to awareness, bans on smoking in public places, and prohibitive taxation.... More »

Study Backs Virtual Colonoscopy

Computer scan as effective as invasive procedure

(Newser) - A new study has found a virtual colonoscopy to be almost as effective as a conventional invasive procedure in detecting colon cancer, USA Today reports. Virtual colonoscopies, using scans and computer imaging, discovered 90% of the cancers located by regular colonoscopies, in which a scope is physically passed through the... More »

Don't Be Fooled: Prostate Cancer Screening Is Key

Guidelines against PSA testing could cost lives

(Newser) - A national task force’s recent warning against prostate cancer screenings in some men could put their lives at risk, cautions physician and researcher William J. Catalona in the Washington Post. “It's important to note that consideration was not given to the overwhelming body of emerging evidence that screening... More »

Panel: Don't Screen Older Men for Prostate Cancer

Treatment may be more harmful than helpful after the age of 74

(Newser) - Physicians should stop screening men 75 and older for prostate cancer, according to new guidelines issued by national health task force. Prostate cancer is "overdiagnosed" in up to 44% of cases—that is, the cancer is present but so slow growing that it would probably never produce symptoms in... More »

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