neuroscience

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Women's Brains More Active Than Men's in 2 Key Areas

Those managing self-control and focus, as well as mood disorders

(Newser) - In the latest "men are from Mars, women are from Venus" debate, neuroscience jumps into the fray. In what UPI deems the "largest functional brain imaging survey ever," researchers from California's Amen Clinics used a type of 3D imaging to determine that women's brains are... More »

Alzheimer's May Afflict More Than Just Humans

Telltale signs have been observed in chimps

(Newser) - Humans are the only animal known to develop Alzheimer's disease, and an official diagnosis requires checking off this list of three things: dementia, which is observed through screenings, and two pathologic markers—amyloid plaques (sticky bunches of misfolded proteins) and neurofibrillary tangles (tau proteins clumped together and twisted around).... More »

She Was Famed for Examining Einstein's Preserved Brain

Neuroscientist Marian Diamond dies at 90

(Newser) - Marian Diamond, a neuroscientist who studied Albert Einstein's brain and was the first to show that the brain's anatomy can change with experience, died on July 25 in Oakland, Calif. She was 90. Diamond, a professor of integrative biology at the University of California-Berkeley, became famous in 1984... More »

Kissing the 'Right' Way: Most of Us Don't Go Left

New research suggests this tendency might be innate

(Newser) - Dig if you will the picture: two people engaged in a kiss. Prince sang about "curious poses," but new research suggests that most of us may strike similar poses, leaning to the right instead of the left when kissing the lips of our partners. Researchers at the University... More »

She Lost Her Vision, but in Rare Phenomenon, Can 'See'

Scientists have found some who are blind can perceive their environments

(Newser) - It's incredibly rare and incredibly intriguing. A few people in the world have something called "blindsight," which describes their ability to subconsciously perceive their environments in spite of being blind. A researcher in 2007 described the science of the phenomenon—the term was coined in 1974 —... More »

Elon Musk's New Project Will Merge Brains, Computers

He wants to make 'neural lace' a reality

(Newser) - Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk's new venture isn't rocket science—it's brain surgery. The futurist entrepreneur's new company, Neuralink Corp., plans to merge human brains with computers, insiders tell the Wall Street Journal . The computer interface would become part of the brain with the help... More »

How the Brains of Those Blinded at a Young Age Differ

Some areas show increased connectivity

(Newser) - Ever wonder whether being blind was in some way an advantage for pianists like Ray Charles, George Shearing, Art Tatum, and Stevie Wonder? New research published in the journal PLOS ONE finds that the brains of people blind from a young age are dramatically different than the brains of normally... More »

Music Really Is a Drug

Rock 'n' roll hits your brain the same way as sex and drugs

(Newser) - Scientists are developing a deeper understanding of what's going on in our brains when sex, drugs, and rock 'n' roll make us feel high, reports Popular Science . Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, who wrote the 2006 bestseller This Is Your Brain on Music, has published a study looking into exactly... More »

Don't Marry Mario: 'Locked-in' Patients Can Finally 'Talk'

They communicate by thinking yes or no

(Newser) - Four paralyzed patients unable to communicate for years were finally able to do so through a potentially groundbreaking brain-reading system. And it turns out that one of them really didn't want his daughter to marry her boyfriend. The patients all had advanced ALS and were unable to control even... More »

Your Life May Indeed Flash Before Your Eyes at Death

But not chronologically, more of a jumble, say researchers

(Newser) - The idea that our lives flash before our eyes in the moments before we die may sound close to mystical, but neurologists at Hadassah University in Jerusalem say the phenomenon—or at least some version of it—appears to be quite common. They found, however, that "life review experiences,... More »

Another Hangover to Worry About

'Emotional hangovers' can shape future memories, study shows

(Newser) - With more holiday revelry looming, the last thing we need to worry about is another type of hangover. But odds are we've already experienced a phenomenom called "emotional hangover." That's the name neuroscientists have given to that heartsick feeling that trails painful experiences or the euphoria... More »

Scientists Map 97 New Areas of the Human Brain

'A huge leap in neuroscience'

(Newser) - It's not quite the leap from an 18th-century atlas to Google Maps, but it's close. The Verge reports scientists from Washington University in St. Louis have created a new map of the human brain that includes 97 areas never before identified. They published their findings Wednesday in Nature... More »

Why You Toss and Turn the First Night in a Strange Place

Blame the left side of your brain: researchers

(Newser) - If you find it hard to doze off on your first night in unfamiliar surroundings, you're not alone—and it may be because you're like a dolphin. In a study published in Current Biology , Brown University scientists found this type of sleep disturbance (referred to as the "... More »

Scientists Can Now Control Mouse Minds With Magnets

And that could have huge implications for humans

(Newser) - Scientists at the University of Virginia were able to control the brains of living mice using magnetic fields, essentially harnessing the power of mind control, according to a study published this week in Nature Neuroscience. Researchers created a synthetic gene—dubbed Magneto, obviously—that is sensitive to magnetic fields and... More »

Woman Develops 'Temporary Kleptomania' After Surgery

Brazilian went in for a tummy tuck and boob job, came out with a desire to steal

(Newser) - A woman who went under the knife for a little nip-and-tuck in 2013 ended up with a case of pocket-and-run as well. Per Live Science , the 40-year-old Brazilian had cosmetic surgery on her stomach, arms, and breasts, but just a few days after the procedure, she started having "recurring... More »

Researchers Explain Why We Sigh

It's actually a vital life process to keep our lungs functioning: study

(Newser) - People may think they sigh just for the heck of it, but UCLA and Stanford researchers have pinpointed two specific clusters of neurons in the brain stem that appear to turn normal breaths into sighs—and that process may happen for a vital reason, a press release notes. Using mice... More »

Scientists: We May Be Able to Alter Human Intelligence

There are 2 gene networks perhaps controlled by master 'switches': researchers

(Newser) - Researchers from London's Imperial College think they've found two networks of genes, possibly controlled by a master system, that control cognitive functions—a find that may allow them to modify human intelligence down the line, the Guardian reports. In a study published in Nature Neuroscience , scientists say these... More »

Why Putin Walks That Weird Walk

It may be because of his KGB weapons training: scientists

(Newser) - The peculiar walk of one Vladimir Putin (left arm swinging naturally, right arm stiff at his side) has been the subject of speculation, with guesses ranging from childhood illness to an in-utero stroke, Live Science reports. But a group of Dutch neuroscientists—or "movement disorder enthusiasts," as they... More »

The Mice Have Spoken: Taste Is an Illusion

Scientists turn sense of taste on and off by manipulating brain cells: study

(Newser) - That bitter tincture a bunch of mice in a Columbia University lab recently gagged on could have been sweet nectar, or even just plain water. Why they took issue with the taste: For a study published in the journal Nature , scientists fiddled with their brain cells to make them think... More »

Brain Scan 'Fingerprints' Can Show How Smart We Are

Scientists say 'connectivity profiles' may predict how well we do on cognitive tasks

(Newser) - Each person's brain activity, or "connectivity profile," may be as unique as a set of fingerprints, YaleNews reports—and could prove useful in IDing individuals, assessing intelligence, and predicting future success on certain tasks. In a study published Monday in Nature Neuroscience , scientists reviewed fMRI scans for... More »

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