Forced Abortions Continue in Parts of China
Regional officials reportedly disregard official national policy
Chinese grandparents and grandchildren play in a park in Dafeng, in east China's Jiangsu province.   (AP Photo/Alexander F. Yuan, file)

(User Submitted) – China's one-child policy, long a staple of its public policy for urban, ethnic Han Chinese, officially exists on the national level as a series of monetary incentives for those who hold to it and monetary punishments for those who run afoul. Numerous interviews and investigations, however, consistently uncover the policy as it is often applied: through forced, sometimes very late-term, abortions.

China's national government continues to hold to the position that such action is strictly against stated policy—a policy apparently routinely violated by local and regional authorities eager to meet population growth control guidelines in order to secure their lucrative party seats. Click through for the al-Jazeera story of Xiao Ai Ying, a woman whose second child was removed at 8 months in utero. More details at NPR.
 

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