Utah Gun Group: We'll Train Teachers Free

Los Angeles gun buybacks do roaring trade

By Matt Cantor,  Newser Staff

Posted Dec 27, 2012 9:06 AM CST

(Newser) – A Utah gun organization normally charges $50 for concealed-weapons training—but for teachers, the program is now free, the AP reports. "We're not suggesting that teachers roam the halls" looking for attackers, says the chair of the top state gun lobby, the Utah Shooting Sports Council. "They should lock down the classroom. But a gun is one more option if the shooter gets in." Says a top state education lawyer: "It's a horrible, terrible, no-good, rotten idea." Elsewhere in gun news:

  • Arizona AG Tom Horne is also hoping to get guns in school staffers' hands—though just one employee per school, Politico reports. Training one school worker would be a "golden mean" between arming all teachers and "doing nothing," according to a press release.

  • In Colorado, demand for guns is soaring—and so are wait times for background checks. While such checks took just minutes a few weeks back, thousands of people are now seeing wait times of at least 100 hours, the Denver Post notes.
  • In Los Angeles, however, the long lines are of thousands of people returning guns, not buying them. The city's program to give gun owners grocery gift cards in exchange for their weapons has been a roaring success, the LA Times reports. Handguns and rifles can bring in up to $100, while assault weapons can net owners $200.
  • The AP has some raw stats: Some 561 children aged 12 and under were killed by guns between 2006 and 2010, the FBI says, at a regular rate of more than 100 each year.

A Utah gun organization says it will train teachers for free.
A Utah gun organization says it will train teachers for free.   (Shutterstock)
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