How China Will Move 250M From Country to City in 12 Years
Will mass urbanization create growth or just destroy rural life?
By Ruth Brown, Newser Staff
Posted Jun 16, 2013 4:24 PM CDT
A man looks out from the window of his home at his apartment complex in Shanghai, China.   (AP Photo/Elizabeth Dalziel)

(Newser) – In the 1980s, 20% of people in China lived in the city. Today, it's 53%. By 2025, the country's leaders wants 70% of the population to be city-dwellers—about 900 million people. How do you do that? Bulldoze the villages and build new cities from scratch, reports the New York Times. Farmers sell their land to corporations and municipalities, and move into big apartment towers rent-free—a change that's exciting for some, and worrying for others, as the newly built towns don't necessarily offer many opportunities for employment. And many farmers say they are not actually given a choice in surrendering their land.

Theoretically, more urbanites means more consumers and tax-payers and thus greater growth. But the move is still a risky one. It will cost China an estimated $600 billion a year, as it builds new infrastructure and pays for education, health care, and pensions for the former farmers. And while the urbanization is already well underway, the government has still not finalized its actual blueprint for the plan. If the strategy fails, there are fears the new urbanites will just become a new urban underclass. "There’s this feeling that we have to modernize, we have to urbanize and this is our national-development strategy," says a rural development expert. "It’s almost like another Great Leap Forward."

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Showing 3 of 12 comments
CentristIntelligence
Sep 24, 2013 7:00 AM CDT
This is their bandaid fix to try and prevent a bubble burst in the real estate industry. They are grossly overinflated there and risk a form of economic collapse if it bursts. They have spent billions building entire cities that remain bare to this day, and if they don't force people to move there like they are doing their economy will have a serious pitfall and probably crash.
saucier111
Jun 16, 2013 10:22 PM CDT
You are seeing how well it worked in America, one out of every seven people are on foodstamps.
XFACTOR
Jun 16, 2013 9:10 PM CDT
obumer will pay for it, right out of our pockets.