Storms Strike US South, Killing 5
More snow, sleet set to fall over the weekend
By Neal Colgrass,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 7, 2013 6:55 AM CST
As freezing rain falls, Tyshun Lindsey, 15, donning a Santa hat and beard rings a bell to get drivers attention near White Station Friday, Dec. 6, 2013, in Memphis, Tenn.   (AP Photo/The Commercial Appeal, Mark Weber)
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(Newser) – Real-live winter in the South? You bet: Unlikely ice storms hammered southern states yesterday, depriving thousands of power, forcing hundreds of flight cancellations, and killing at least five people, CNN reports. It's not over, either: Storms are poised to strike regions from Dallas to Memphis until tomorrow and Arkansas through Monday. The north will also get its share, with sleet or snow hitting central New England through the central Appalachians into today, and blanketing the nation's capital tomorrow. In other details:

  • Dallas/Forth Worth had it worst, canceling nearly 700 flights and the downtown Dallas holiday parade for the first time in 26 years. The storm cut out power for more than 200,000 customers.
  • Temperature swings were shocking: In Hot Springs, Arkansas, a temperate 75-degree day on Wednesday turned into an ice storm yesterday.
  • Most fatalities occurred on icy roads, including the death of Granby, Missouri, Mayor Ronald Arnall, whose car veered off a state highway in southern Missouri and hit a tree, Reuters reports. Oklahoma alone has recorded about 116 storm-related injuries.
  • A new storm struck the Pacific Coast yesterday, dropping pretty heavy snow on Portland. Even Las Vegas might see snow today—up to 2 inches.
  • But it's not so bad by comparison: In northern Europe, a powerful storm with hurricane-force winds kicked up a huge tidal surge and killed 8 people, CBC News reports.

 

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