No Survivors in Mali Crash
French troops locate one black box after plane goes down
By Newser Editors, Newser Staff
Posted Jul 25, 2014 3:16 AM CDT
Updated Jul 25, 2014 7:49 AM CDT
The logo of the Air Algerie company office is seen in Paris.   (AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

(Newser) – French officials have sent troops to secure the site in northern Mali where an Air Algerie plane crashed yesterday, but expect no miracles: "Sadly, there is no survivor," French President Francois Hollande said today, reports the Guardian. He also said that one black box had been recovered and was being evaluated, though the best guess remains that the plane went down over the desert in bad weather. France had about 50 passengers on the plane and is taking a lead role in the investigation, while the total number of people aboard has been raised to 118 from 116.

France's interior minister cautioned that "no hypothesis can be excluded as long as we don't have the results of an investigation," reports AP. He noted that terrorist groups "hostile to Western interests" operate in the area near the Burkina Faso border where the plane went down. Still, officials say the final message from the pilots of the Swiftair MD-83 was a request to change their flight path because of heavy rain. The plane is in a "disintegrated state" with the wreckage "concentrated in a limited area," says Hollande, according to CNN.

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Showing 3 of 5 comments
Estrus
Jul 26, 2014 2:51 AM CDT
I flew in some scary weather, including landing and taking off in fog with near zero visibility. the pilot must not have been very good flying in foul weather.
fractal
Jul 25, 2014 12:33 PM CDT
When profit becomes more important than safety...
kj_nm
Jul 25, 2014 7:46 AM CDT
a very old aircraft flown by an iffy airline. Not a bad idea to avoid all African airlines because that's where obsolete US and European aircraft end up