Thousands of Spiders Drive Owners From Ritzy Home
Missouri family gives up trying to fight the brown recluses
By John Johnson,  Newser Staff
Posted Oct 10, 2014 4:17 PM CDT
In this photo taken on Oct. 5, workers finish covering the house with a tarp before fumigation.   (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, J.B. Forbes)
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(Newser) – If you like golf and you love spiders, then Fannie Mae has got your dream home waiting in Missouri. The foreclosed home in Weldon Spring overlooks a golf course but has been vacant for two years because apparently nobody wants to live with the estimated 4,000 to 6,000 brown recluse spiders that drove out the previous owners, reports the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. (Note that the spider estimate may be low because it was taken during the winter.) Good news for potential buyers, though: The newspaper explains that these particular spiders have a painful bite, but it's "almost never fatal." And KMOV adds this perspective from an expert at the University of Kansas: “It’s not going to kill you, but it will make you wish you were dead."

Fannie Mae has brought in fumigators who swear they will rid the place of the spiders for good, and the home will presumably be up for sale soon. Meanwhile, legal disputes continue among the unwitting family who bought the house in 2007 for $450,000, the previous owners who didn't disclose that the spiders lived everywhere, and State Farm (which is refusing to pay a cent). The Post-Dispatch describes what the wife in the family who most recently owned the place discovered immediately after moving in:

  • She "saw spiders and their webs every day. They were in the mini blinds, the air registers, the pantry ceiling, the fireplace. Their exoskeletons were falling from the can lights. Once when she was showering, she dodged a spider as it fell from the ceiling and washed down the drain."
Click to read about why spiders seem to prefer living in the city over the country.
 

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